Archives de catégorie : Pays de Galles / Wales

Continuity and Conquest – Memory and Social Practice in the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman Realms

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2018

Call for Papers

Conquests are traditionally seen as some of the great turning points of history: paradigm shifts in which one regime is swept away by another, after which the course of history is forever altered for both subject and conquering peoples. However, conquests are frequently defined as much by their continuities as their changes. Memory plays a key role both in legitimisation and in resisting conquest, but also in the reconciliation and acceptance of new regimes. This role of memory is also frequent!y precipitated by, and reflected in, change and continuity in social practices, across diverse social strata and ethnie identities. For example, it is evident in political, legal, and religious practices, but also in wider social trends such as marriage and naming practices. Moreover, changing memories of conquest can be detected in their presentation in narrative sources, with differing perceptions of the past being articulated to rationalise, decry, or legitimise the present.

These sessions will cover the role of social practices in the memory of conquest in the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman worlds. We hope to challenge the problematic historiographically-embedded divides caused by traditional periodisation by examining the eleventh to thirteenth centuries as a whole. The sessions will explore the effects of conquest and both the continuity and change in social practices and processes of memorialisation which occurred in their wake. The three sessions will begin in the eleventh century (r016 and ro66), then cover the later effects of conquest in the twelfth century, before ending with the Joss of Normand y in the early-thirteenth century (1204).

Proposed papers should be 20 minutes in length, on topics including (but not limited to):

  • Formation and re-formation of ethnie and social identities.
  • Appropriation (and forgetting) of the pre-conquest past.
  • Change and continuity in religious, legal, and political practices.
  • Differing perceptions of the past among differing social strata.
  • Assimilation/acculturation of conquered and conquerors.

Continuity And Conquest PDF

Veninger Jacqueline, Archaeological landscapes of conflict in twelfth-century Gwynedd

Veninger Jacqueline, Archaeological landscapes of conflict in twelfth-century Gwynedd, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (University of Exeter)

Continuer la lecture de Veninger Jacqueline, Archaeological landscapes of conflict in twelfth-century Gwynedd

Colclough Samantha Jane, Image and reality in medieval weaponry and warfare : Wales c.1100-c.1450

Colclough Samantha Jane, Image and reality in medieval weaponry and warfare : Wales c.1100-c.1450, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015, (Bangor University)

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available.

[Source : http://e.bangor.ac.uk/5430/]

Connors Owain James, The Effects of Anglo-Norman Lordship upon the Landscape of Post-Conquest Monmouthshire

Connors Owain James, The Effects of Anglo-Norman Lordship upon the Landscape of Post-Conquest Monmouthshire, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. S. Rippon, O. Creighton)

Résumé/abstract :

This thesis examines the effects the imposition of Anglo-Norman lordship, following the Anglo-Norman expansion into Wales in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, had upon the landscape of the Welsh border region. In order to achieve this aim this project makes extensive use of digital Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in order to produce a detailed county-wide study of the landscape of post-Conquest Monmouthshire as well as comprehensive case studies of individual Anglo-Norman lordships contained within the boundaries of the county. This thesis also aims to locate its findings within important current debates in historic archaeology about the effects of medieval lordship upon the landscape, on the roles of the physical environment and human agency in the forming of the historic landscape, on the wider role of castles as lordship centres, beyond simple military functionality.

[Source : https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/handle/10871/14641]

monumentsnetwork.org/

Runes, Monuments and Memorial Carvings

An International Research Network

http://monumentsnetwork.org/

The RMMC Network brings together researchers, including postgraduate students, in the fields of, for instance, History, Viking Studies, Medieval Studies, Runology, Art History, History of Religion, Archaeology, and Historical Linguistics with the intention to build up and strengthen an interdisciplinary research environment for researchers working with different aspects of carved stone monuments from the Viking Age and the early Middle Ages in Scandinavia, the British Isles, Ireland and Northern Europe.

Continuer la lecture de monumentsnetwork.org/

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Université d’Angers)

Continuer la lecture de Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

History Books in the Anglo-Norman World c.1100-c.1300

History Books in the Anglo-Norman World c.1100-c.1300

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Laura Cleaver (cleaverl@tcd.ie)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

Trinity College Dublin

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries history (interpreted as both the recent past and a period stretching back to include the biblical narrative) seems to have become a major interest for both the educated elite and a growing audience who accessed ideas through vernacular texts. New chronicles and annals were produced, together with accounts of the histories of particular peoples, nations and subjects. At the same time, history was explored through images in books and other media. Much historical writing in this period dealt with issues of conquest and identity, which were often allied to geography, ethnicity or particular institutions. The ‘History Books’ project, funded by the Marie Curie Programme (FP7), will examine surviving medieval manuscripts in order to investigate the writing of history in areas controlled by the Anglo-Norman Empire, concentrating on the period 1100-1300. In particular the project will explore the use of images in the presentation of history in books and beyond.

[Lien/Link : https://www.tcd.ie/History_of_Art/research/history-books.php]

Majoros Christie, The function of hospitaller houses in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales

Majoros Christie, The function of hospitaller houses in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, (dir. H. Nicholson, P. Edbury, University of Cardiff)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Résumé/abstract :

The specific goal of this project is to determine what kind of function the houses of the Hospitallers in the British Isles performed, or were intended to perform. Since it is clear that not all Hospitaller houses were built or acquiredfor a hospitable or charitable purpose, they must have been maintained by the Order for other reasons. I plan to investigate individual houses in an effort to determine what these other reasons were. Specifically, I will be looking for evidence of usefulness in one of four ways: martial, charitable, religious, or economic. The degree to which these houses were actually successful in fulfilling the function expected of them would be of secondary importance, entering into the discussion only where relevant to the determination of function. The project’s purpose is instead to create a comprehensive study that can be used as a tool for further research, allowing larger arguments to be made regarding both the activities and administrative practices of the Hospitaller Order in the British Isles, and how these practices figured into regional and international needs both within and outside of the Order.

[Source : http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/share/contactsandpeople/postgraduatestudents/christiemajoros-overview_new.html]

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales, (dir. O. Creighton, S. Rippon, University of Exeter)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://eprofile.exeter.ac.uk/owainconnors/]

Acta of the Plantagenets

Acta of the Plantagenets

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Nicholas Vincent (n.vincent@uea.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The texts of original charters, writs, letters, and other documents, as well as copies and transcripts of them made between the twelfth century and the present, are being prepared for editions intended for publication, beginning with the acts of Henry II. In addition to those of Henry, the project has also collected the acts of Eleanor of Aquitaine, of Richard I, of John as Lord of Ireland and Count of Mortain, and of other members of the Plantagenet family.

[Lien/Link : http://www.britac.ac.uk/arp/acta.cfm]

Jenkins James, King John and the Cistercians in Wales

Jenkins James, King John and the Cistercians in Wales, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2012, (dir. H.J. Nicholson, University of Cardiff)

Although the primary aim of this thesis was originally to explore the dynamic between King John and the Cistercians in Wales, it has been necessary to go beyond the bounds of this remit, namely to explore his relations with the Order in Ireland and England and also as a whole, to put his relations with the Cistercians in Wales into greater context. Primarily from an analysis of the charters John issued to individual abbeys, this thesis demonstrates that the interactions between John and individual Cistercian houses was not determined by where they were, rather their dynamic was more complex. John’s grants to individual houses were often an extension of his relationship with the abbey’s patron, when they were favoured their houses would prosper, when they fell from grace or defied John, their abbeys would suffer. Only however, by placing the charters John granted to individual houses into their wider political context can this correlation be appreciated, namely whether they were issued when John was trying to woo or punish the patron or at a time of hostility with the wider Order and as such clear demonstrations of royal favour. This was not the only dynamic that influenced the relationships between John and individual houses, those abbots who supported and opposed John were shown royal favour and anger respectively, and often this factor overrode all other concerns.

[Source : http://orca.cf.ac.uk/43581/]

The Charters of William II and Henry I

The Charters of William II and Henry I

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Richard Sharpe (richard.sharpe@history.ox.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Oxford

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The overall aim is to collect, edit, and interpret the royal acts issued in the names of two English kings, William II (reigned 1087 to 1100), and his brother Henry I (reigned 1100 to 1135), who was also duke of Normandy from 1106 until 1135. Royal acts, mainly charters but also writs and other letters, are the prime documentary source for the period, providing the means to understand the workings of the realm in a way not possible from chronicles and other narrative sources.

This edition differs from previous work on documents of this period by treating beneficiary archives as a unit. Although the king issued documents for his own reasons in many circumstances, for example royal proclamations, treaties, royal letters, and writs concerning fiscal administration, these rarely survive. What remains, therefore, is very largely the material in whose preservation someone had a direct interest. Most documents, even those representing the exercise of the king’s power such as the appointment of bishops or abbots, survive through the archive of the beneficiary who received and retained the documents. Different beneficiary archives tell different stories. The organization of the edition presents, for the most part, beneficiary archives with a headnote to explain the background, including the motivations behind seeking the king’s seal and the reasons for preservation.

When complete, the edition will include several hundred beneficiary archives. The acts are not distributed evenly between them: almost half are contained in just thirty archives. The files currently available on this site represent about an eighth of the material to be included in the final edition, which will be published as a multi-volume book.

[Lien/Link : https://actswilliam2henry1.wordpress.com/]

Roberts Euryn, Hunaniaeth ranbarthol yng Nghymru, c.1100-1283

Roberts Euryn, Hunaniaeth ranbarthol yng Nghymru, c.1100-1283 [Regional identity in Wales, c.1100-1283], Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. H. Pryce, N. Powell, Bangor University)

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available.

Zeiser Sarah, Latinity, manuscripts, and the rhetoric of conquest in late-eleventh-century Wales

Zeiser Sarah, Latinity, manuscripts, and the rhetoric of conquest in late-eleventh-century Wales, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2012, (dir. C. McKenna, Harvard University)

Résumé/abstract :

This dissertation explores the complex interactions among written text, language choice, and political context in Wales in the late-eleventh and early-twelfth centuries. I argue that writers in medieval Wales created in both their literary compositions and their manuscripts intricate layers of protest and subversion in direct opposition to the authority of the Anglo-Norman political hegemony and the aggrandizing spread of the Canterbury-led church. These medieval literati exploited language and script as tools of definition. They privileged Welsh or Latin when their audience shifted, and they employed the change from early Insular script to the Caroline script of the Normans as not just a natural evolution in script development, but as a selective representation of mimicked authority. The family of Bishop Sulien at Llanbadarn Fawr has been the focal point of this study, as they were active during a time of Anglo-Norman intervention in their community that is reflected in the shifting script of their manuscripts and the apprehensive though proud tone of their compositions, which include the vitae of saints David and Padarn and the poetry of Ieuan and Rhygyfarch ap Sulien. My work provides a much-needed cohesive portrait of the multilingual medieval Welsh literary culture at the turn of the twelfth century. Questions of audience and authority come into play, particularly when considering the growing hybridity of learned communities during the Anglo-Norman infiltration of Wales. Manuscripts themselves are viewed as vehicles of identity, for the evolution of script and design offers clues as to the methods of compromise practiced by Welsh intellectuals. This compromise in the written word can be viewed as an embodiment of the Welsh desire and need to mediate fraught political boundaries, as they did using both the ‘nation’-defining Welsh language and the vehicular prestige language of Latin, resulting in an intertextual exploration of identity through the act of writing itself. Writing is a critical demonstration of Welsh authorship and agency in medieval Britain, and one that can be used to reflect upon notions of Welsh identity.

[Source : http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/10288377]