Archives de catégorie : Lieux, populations, culture matérielle / Places, populations, material culture

Continuity and Conquest – Memory and Social Practice in the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman Realms

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2018

Call for Papers

Conquests are traditionally seen as some of the great turning points of history: paradigm shifts in which one regime is swept away by another, after which the course of history is forever altered for both subject and conquering peoples. However, conquests are frequently defined as much by their continuities as their changes. Memory plays a key role both in legitimisation and in resisting conquest, but also in the reconciliation and acceptance of new regimes. This role of memory is also frequent!y precipitated by, and reflected in, change and continuity in social practices, across diverse social strata and ethnie identities. For example, it is evident in political, legal, and religious practices, but also in wider social trends such as marriage and naming practices. Moreover, changing memories of conquest can be detected in their presentation in narrative sources, with differing perceptions of the past being articulated to rationalise, decry, or legitimise the present.

These sessions will cover the role of social practices in the memory of conquest in the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman worlds. We hope to challenge the problematic historiographically-embedded divides caused by traditional periodisation by examining the eleventh to thirteenth centuries as a whole. The sessions will explore the effects of conquest and both the continuity and change in social practices and processes of memorialisation which occurred in their wake. The three sessions will begin in the eleventh century (r016 and ro66), then cover the later effects of conquest in the twelfth century, before ending with the Joss of Normand y in the early-thirteenth century (1204).

Proposed papers should be 20 minutes in length, on topics including (but not limited to):

  • Formation and re-formation of ethnie and social identities.
  • Appropriation (and forgetting) of the pre-conquest past.
  • Change and continuity in religious, legal, and political practices.
  • Differing perceptions of the past among differing social strata.
  • Assimilation/acculturation of conquered and conquerors.

Continuity And Conquest PDF

Di Bartolo Francesco, Abitati rupestri e citta’ fortificate nella Sicilia occidentale dai bizantini ai normanni

Di Bartolo Francesco, Abitati rupestri e citta’ fortificate nella Sicilia occidentale dai bizantini ai normanni, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (Università di Bologna)

Continuer la lecture de Di Bartolo Francesco, Abitati rupestri e citta’ fortificate nella Sicilia occidentale dai bizantini ai normanni

Gleeson Caitríona M., A social archaeology of Anglo-Norman Cork

Gleeson Caitríona M., A social archaeology of Anglo-Norman Cork, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (NUI Galway)

Continuer la lecture de Gleeson Caitríona M., A social archaeology of Anglo-Norman Cork

Brewington Seth, Social-Ecological Resilience in the Viking-Age to Early-Medieval Faroe Islands

Brewington Seth, Social-Ecological Resilience in the Viking-Age to Early-Medieval Faroe Islands, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (City University of New York)

Continuer la lecture de Brewington Seth, Social-Ecological Resilience in the Viking-Age to Early-Medieval Faroe Islands

Ljung Cecilia, Under runristad häll : Tidigkristna gravmonument i 1000-talets Sverige

Ljung Cecilia, Under runristad häll : Tidigkristna gravmonument i 1000-talets Sverige, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Stockholm University)

Continuer la lecture de Ljung Cecilia, Under runristad häll : Tidigkristna gravmonument i 1000-talets Sverige

Karlsson Johnny, Spill Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i Mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid

Karlsson Johnny, Spill Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i Mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Stockholm University)

Continuer la lecture de Karlsson Johnny, Spill Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i Mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid

Pereswetoff-Morath Sofia, Vikingatida runbleck Läsningar och tolkningar

Pereswetoff-Morath Sofia, Vikingatida runbleck Läsningar och tolkningar, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Uppsala universitet)

Continuer la lecture de Pereswetoff-Morath Sofia, Vikingatida runbleck Läsningar och tolkningar

Meloni Dino, Cuisine, écriture et savoir : transmissions et renaissance de la cuisine médiévale anglaise (XIe-XVe siècles)

Meloni Dino, Cuisine, écriture et savoir : transmissions et renaissance de la cuisine médiévale anglaise (XIe-XVe siècles), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (Université Paris-Sorbonne)

Continuer la lecture de Meloni Dino, Cuisine, écriture et savoir : transmissions et renaissance de la cuisine médiévale anglaise (XIe-XVe siècles)

Leonard, Alison M. A., Nested negotiations : landscape and portable material culture in Viking-Age England

Leonard, Alison M. A., Nested negotiations : landscape and portable material culture in Viking-Age England, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (University of York)

Continuer la lecture de Leonard, Alison M. A., Nested negotiations : landscape and portable material culture in Viking-Age England

Cartwright Ben Helmut John, Making the cloth that binds us : the role of spinning and weaving in crafting the communities of Viking Age Atlantic Scotland (AD c.600-1400)

Cartwright Ben Helmut John, Making the cloth that binds us : the role of spinning and weaving in crafting the communities of Viking Age Atlantic Scotland (AD c.600-1400), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (University of Cambridge)

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?did=1&uin=uk.bl.ethos.708804]

 

De Roo Tessa Frances, The Viking sea from A to B : charting the nautical routes from Scandinavia in the early Viking Age

De Roo Tessa Frances, The Viking sea from A to B : charting the nautical routes from Scandinavia in the early Viking Age, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015, (University of Cambridge)

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?did=1&uin=uk.bl.ethos.709070]

[Les Échos du Craham] Compte rendu de la soutenance du dossier d’HDR de Laurence Jean-Marie, “La Normandie, les villes et la mer (XIIe-début du XIVe siècle)”

l-jean-marie-minVendredi 9 décembre 2016, Université de Caen Normandie

Devant une assistance nombreuse, Élodie Lecuppre-Desjardins, professeur d’histoire médiévale à l’Université de Lille III et présidente du jury, introduit la séance.

Laurence Jean-Marie entreprend d’abord de rendre compte rapidement de l’ensemble des principaux éléments de son dossier d’HDR, qui témoignent d’un parcours long.

Le dossier s’intitule « La Normandie, les villes et la mer (XIIe-début du XIVe siècle) ». Conformément aux exigences habituelles, il comprend trois éléments : un mémoire de synthèse (ego-histoire : « Un parcours d’enseignant-chercheur en histoire »), un recueil de publications témoignant de l’orientation des recherches de la candidate depuis 10 ans (« Entre Normandie et Angleterre : élites urbaines, ports et gens de mer »), et un mémoire inédit sur « Le prince, la Normandie et la mer (milieu du XIIe siècle-1204) ».

Lire la suite sur Les Échos du Craham

Post-Doctoral research fellowship attached to the project « Using the Past in the Past. Viking Age Scandinavia as a Renaissance? »

University of Oslo, Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History

A post-doctoral Research Fellowship (SKO 1352) in the project « Using the Past in the Past. Viking Age Scandinavia as a Renaissance? » is available at the Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History (IAKH), University of Oslo.

The project explores how and why the past was used in Viking Age Scandinavia, the 9th to mid-11th century AD: how past monuments and artefacts were recycled materially and referentially in this period; the different strategies of constructing places for commemoration; and the choice of objects to be preserved through the centuries to enhance new interpretational frames of utilizing the past in the past. This was a central, active element in the mentality and world-view, and took shape in political and social processes in diverging scales and forms.

Continuer la lecture de Post-Doctoral research fellowship attached to the project « Using the Past in the Past. Viking Age Scandinavia as a Renaissance? »

From Vikings to Normans in England and Ireland

Article publié dans le dossier thématique – actes de la journée d’étude du 20 novembre 2015, Les transferts culturels dans les mondes normands médiévaux I – Des mots pour le dire ?

From Vikings to Normans in England and Ireland

David Griffiths

University of Oxford, England, UK


In this short piece, I address the ways in which historians and archaeologists have approached, interpreted and described the Viking and Norman presences in England and Ireland. These are treated as very different phenomena, yet in many ways have similar origins and effects. ‘Vikings’ (a word hardly used in near-contemporary historical sources, which use ‘Northmen’, ‘Gentiles’, Foreigners’) became a feature of English and Irish historical consciousness from the 780s AD, with raids followed by more sustained semi-systematic warfare coupled to settlement and assimilation, and ultimately dynastic rivalry and competing claims on statehood. The latter are exemplified in England by the successful attempt by Svein Forkbeard of Denmark to wrest the crown and make way for his son Cnut’s accession in 1016, and in Ireland by the creation of the kingdom of Dublin and the failed attempts by external powers in the Norse world to invade Ireland in 1014 and by Magnus Barelegs of Norway in 1098/1103. Duke William of Normandy, it will need no reminder to say, invaded southern England in 1066, and over the following 20 years (expensively and often bloodily) established Norman rule over the majority of the country. An important dimension to the Norman invasion is its coincidence with the Northumbrian rebellion against Harold II and the Norwegian invasion led by Harald Hardraði, which narrowly failed at the Battle of Stamford Bridge on 25 September 1066, three days prior to the Norman fleet landing at Pevensey, Sussex. Following William’s success at Hastings, and his assumption of the crown, further unsuccessful Danish campaign was mounted against England in 1069-70. Subsequently in 1169-71, led initially by Norman settlers from West Wales, and representing the king Henry II (also Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou), an Anglo-Norman army landed (initially by Irish invitation) in south-eastern Ireland, rapidly effecting a take-over of the towns and then the Irish countryside. Continuer la lecture de From Vikings to Normans in England and Ireland

Luc Bourgeois, Recevoir et réinventer la culture matérielle de l’autre : le jeu d’échecs entre espace islamique et mondes normands

Article publié dans le dossier thématique – actes de la journée d’étude du 20 novembre 2015, Les transferts culturels dans les mondes normands médiévaux I – Des mots pour le dire ?

Recevoir et réinventer la culture matérielle de l’autre : le jeu d’échecs entre espace islamique et mondes normands

 Luc Bourgeois

Université de Caen, Craham

La diffusion du jeu d’échecs en Occident

En l’état des connaissances, le jeu d’échecs aurait pris naissance autour du vie siècle dans le sous-continent indien. Il oppose deux armées qui se déplacent dans un espace de soixante-quatre cases. Sa composition reproduit celle des armées indiennes : des éléphants, des cavaliers, des chars et des fantassins ; ces troupes étant dirigées par un roi associé à un conseiller. Le jeu est transmis à la Perse dès le viie siècle et sa progression vers l’ouest suit la foudroyante expansion arabe entre 632 et 732. La proscription des représentations humaines par certains courants de l’Islam va entraîner le développement parallèle de deux types de pièces : des objets figuratifs, relativement faciles à interpréter lors de leur réception en Occident, et des pièces schématisées, qui vont donner lieu aux lectures les plus baroques.

Continuer la lecture de Luc Bourgeois, Recevoir et réinventer la culture matérielle de l’autre : le jeu d’échecs entre espace islamique et mondes normands