Archives de catégorie : Formes et rituels de pouvoir / Forms and rituals of power

Varley David Hugh, The whirling wheel : the male construction of empowered female identities in Old Norse myth and legend

Varley David Hugh, The whirling wheel : the male construction of empowered female identities in Old Norse myth and legend, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (Durham University)

Continuer la lecture de Varley David Hugh, The whirling wheel : the male construction of empowered female identities in Old Norse myth and legend

Laidoner Triin, Ancestors, their worship and the elite in Viking Age and early medieval Scandinavia

Laidoner Triin, Ancestors, their worship and the elite in Viking Age and early medieval Scandinavia, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (University of Aberdeen)

Continuer la lecture de Laidoner Triin, Ancestors, their worship and the elite in Viking Age and early medieval Scandinavia

Les Vikings en Grande-Bretagne et en Irlande : travaux et recherches en cours

23 oct. 2015 | Université de Caen (France) | MRSH, salle des Actes, SH027, 14H-18H

Les Vikings en Grande-Bretagne et en Irlande : travaux et recherches en cours

Jón Viðar SIGURÐSSON (Université d’Oslo), The Scandinavia power game and the Viking raids
Stephen HARRISON (Université de Glasgow), Early Viking Fortifications in Britain and Ireland
Clare DOWNHAM (Université de Liverpool), Coastal Communities and Diaspora Identities in Viking Age Ireland

Moore Gavin, Earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237

Moore Gavin, Lordly power and lordship: earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237 (dir. K Hurlock, J. Roche, T. Adams, Manchester Metropolitan University)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/research-student-information/current-research-student-profiles/history/]

Mead Emily, Power, patronage and underage rule in Norman Sicily

Mead Emily, Power, patronage and underage rule in Norman Sicily, (dir. A. Metcalfe, Lancaster University)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Résumé/abstract :

This thesis centres on the regency of Countess Adelaide in post conquest Sicily and Calabria (1101-1113). It asks how regency governance was perceived, presented and worked in practise. Fundamentally, it answers the question of just how much this period should simply be painted as one of continuity from the rule of Roger I. In doing so, it exploits Greek and Latin charter material, as well as Latin narratives. Such independent study of Adelaide is essential, prior to further comparative work, owing to the infant political and social climate of Sicily and Calabria in these years.

[Source : http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/history/profiles/emily-mead]

McNair Fraser, The development of territorial principalities between the Loire and the Scheldt, 893-996

McNair Fraser, The development of territorial principalities between the Loire and the Scheldt, 893-996, (dir. R. McKitterick, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis 2012/In preparation since 2012

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/fam38@cam.ac.uk]

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales, (dir. O. Creighton, S. Rippon, University of Exeter)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://eprofile.exeter.ac.uk/owainconnors/]

Carlsson Edward, Relationships and networks of power amongst 11th- and 12th-century Norwegian aristocracy

Carlsson Edward, Relationships and networks of power amongst 11th- and 12th-century Norwegian aristocracy, (dir. T. Wills, M. Gelting, University of Aberdeen)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/relationships-and-networks-power-amongst-11th-and-12th-century-norwegian]

Anderson Elizabeth, Establishing adult masculinity in the Angevin royal family, 1140-1200

Anderson Elizabeth, Establishing adult masculinity in the Angevin royal family, 1140-1200, (dir. K. Lewis, P. Cullum, University of Huddersfield)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/establishing-adult-masculinity-angevin-royal-family-1140-1200]

Cowan Kimberly, Defining the castle through 12th-century chronicle perceptions in the Anglo-Norman regnum

Cowan Kimberly, Defining the castle through 12th-century chronicle perceptions in the Anglo-Norman regnum, (dir. C.J. Tyerman, University of Oxford)

En cours depuis 2012/In preparation since 2012

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/defining-castle-through-12th-century-chronicle-perceptions-anglo-norman]

McManama-Kearin Lisa, The use of G.I.S. in determining the role of visibility in the siting of early Anglo-Norman stone castles in Ireland

McManama-Kearin Lisa, The use of G.I.S. in determining the role of visibility in the siting of early Anglo-Norman stone castles in Ireland, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2010, (Queen’s University Belfast)

Résumé/abstract :

This work examines the effectiveness of the use of GIS and GIS viewsheds as tools in the study of medieval castles in Ireland. To date, archaeological usage of GIS viewsheds has centred on prehistoric funerary sites. Little work has been done using GIS in relation to medieval castles, a subject and time-frame which is well documented. To date, no work has tested GIS and viewshed analysis across a wide comparative sample of castles. This study uses GIS to examine the visibility of and the views from structures about which much is known. A comparable set of twenty sample castles were taken from a particular period in one social/geographical context, the first century of English lordship in Ireland. Research objectives included exploring the priorities of the first three generations of Anglo-Norman castle builders in Ireland, by determining if there are patterns in site choices. Specifically the project aims to establish whether visibility may have played a role in the siting of these castles.

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.534618]

Brown Daniel, Fortune’s wheel: the rise, fall and restoration of Hugh II de Lacy, earl of Ulster, 1190-1242

Brown Daniel, Fortune’s wheel: the rise, fall and restoration of Hugh II de Lacy, earl of Ulster, 1190-1242, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2012, (dir. M.T. Flanagan, Queen’s University Belfast)

Résumé/abstract:

This thesis focuses on one of the most fascinating, and neglected, figures in Angevin Ireland. Forged in the crucible of a frontier society, the career of Hugh II de Lacy was in some ways comparable to those of other second-generation Anglo-Norman colonists grappling for power in a contested land. It is the singular aspects of de Lacy’s story which are of most value to the historian. Hugh’s earldom of Ulster was the first comital creation in Ireland, an honour made all the more intriguing by de Lacy’s relatively modest beginnings. Ulster itself was unique among Ireland’s great feudatories, connected to other constituent polities of the Irish Sea world by trade routes, political alliances and kinship. De Lacy was twice a rebel against the king of England, and spent a decade crusading against dualist heretics in southern France. A study of the earl of Ulster, utilising a wide range of source material, is also a touchstone through which wider themes and questions pertinent to thirteenth-century Ireland can be explored. In examination of Hugh’s written acta, we come to know more about how magnates in Ireland viewed themselves; how others perceived them; and how identity might be consciously shaped. The cohesiveness of the settler community in Ireland is also discussed, along with the factors that could make or break aristocratic relationships. Some assumptions about the development of royal power in Ireland are challenged, and de Lacy’s interactions with the English crown shed light on how nobles won, lost and regained favour with the Angevin Lords of Ireland.

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.600125]

O’Rourke Samuel, Episcopal power in Anglo-Norman England, 1066-1135

O’Rourke Samuel, Episcopal power in Anglo-Norman England, 1066-1135, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (University of East Anglia)

Résumé/abstract :

The thesis presents an empirical view of episcopal power in England from 1066 to 1135. For simplicity’s sake, ‘power’ is defined as efficacy, or the ability to achieve one’s ends. No formal distinction is made here between ‘power’ and ‘authority’. The bulk of the thesis (Chapters 3-5) consists of three case studies: the first examines the political relationship between bishops, the papacy and the kings of England; the second looks at episcopal landholding; and the third considers disputes between bishoprics and abbeys. These case studies start by asking what bishops did: what their political goals were and the extent to which they achieved them. They then ask how bishops did what they did: what resources bishops deployed; why certain actions were possible; why certain strategies were or were not successful. By doing this it is possible to determine the nature of the power which bishops exercised. Three conclusions emerge: firstly, that episcopal power was highly dependent on royal power in this period; secondly, that the basis of episcopal power was often intangible (ideology or personality), rather than material (land or money); and thirdly, that episcopal power was inherently limited, in that bishops sometimes had very little freedom of action. Chapters 1 and 2 are not case studies. They are concerned with ideals of episcopal power. Chapter 1 shows that ideals of episcopal conduct and episcopal power (as expressed in contemporary hagiography) changed in eleventh-century England. It attempts to link these changes to historical developments in this period. Chapter 2 shows that these changing ideals were reflected in the narrative sources for the episcopate of Anglo-Norman England, but not in the reality of episcopal conduct, and that historians have often been misled by these narrative sources, reproducing a model of episcopal power which was little more than a monastic fantasy.

[Source : https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/48695/]

Nancarrow Jane-Heloise, Ruins to re-use: Romano-British remains in post-Conquest literary and material culture

Nancarrow, Jane-Heloise, Ruins to re-use: Romano-British remains in post-Conquest literary and material culture, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (dir. A. McClain, H. Fulton, University of York)

Résumé/abstract :

This thesis examines the re-use of Roman material culture in England following the Norman Conquest at St Albans, Chester, and Colchester. It argues that the material legacy of Roman Britain conveyed a sense of imperial authority, antiquity and longevity and an association with the early Christian church, which were appropriated to serve transitional Norman royal, elite, monastic and parochial interests in different architectural forms. Importantly, this thesis examines literary evidence describing the Roman past, Roman buildings, and even instances of re-use, which were produced at each town as part of the intellectual expansion of the twelfth century. This thesis comprises of two introductory chapters, followed by three central case study chapters, and culminates in a comparative discussion chapter which evaluates re-use in the context of competing socio-political interests following the Norman Conquest. It expands upon previous understandings of re-use by focusing on topography, building material and hidden reuse, in addition to the re-use of portable remains and decorative emulation. The aim of this thesis is to develop an interdisciplinary methodological and theoretical approach to examine re-use, in the knowledge that this yields a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon. In addition to literary and archaeological evidence, it draws theoretical perspectives from history, art history, and literary criticism. The underlying tenet of this thesis challenges the view that re-use was often unremarkable. Through an examination of multi-disciplinary evidence, it becomes clear that re-use was a complex, nuanced and, above all, meaningful part of the architectural endeavours of the Normans, and was used to secure their primacy at these towns and across their emerging nation.

[Source : http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/5123/]

Corsi Maria, Elite networks and courtly culture in medieval Denmark

Corsi Maria, Elite networks and courtly culture in medieval Denmark: Denmark in Europe, 1st to 14th centuries, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (dir. Sally N. Vaughn, University of Houston)

Résumé/abstract :

This dissertation advances the study of the cultural integration of Denmark with continental Europe in the Middle Ages. By approaching the question with a view to the longue durée, it argues that Danish aristocratic culture had been heavily influenced by trends on the Continent since at least the Roman Iron Age, so that when Denmark adopted European courtly culture, it did so simultaneously to its development in the rest of Europe. Because elite culture as it manifested itself in the Middle Ages was an amalgamation of that of Ancient Rome and the Geiuianic tribes, its origins in Denmark is sought in the interactions between the Danish territory and the Roman Empire. Elites in Denmark sought to emulate Roman culture as a marker of status, with pan-European elite networks facilitating the incorporation of Roman material items and social norms in Denmark, thus setting the pattern for later periods. These types of networks continued to play an important role in the interactions between Denmark and the successor kingdoms to the Roman Empire in the Early Middle Ages, leading to the development of an increasingly homogenized elite culture in Denmark and on the Continent. Danish elites drew on the material and ideological cultural models of their southern neighbors, using Frankish imports to signify status and power, much as Roman imports had been used earlier. The economic, diplomatic, and military ties that developed in the Early Middle Ages remained important conduits for the adoption of European aristocratic culture into the High Middle Ages, while the conversion to Christianity by the Danes enabled Danish elites to take part in the new educational networks associated with the rise of universities across Europe. All of these long-standing ties meant that the Danish aristocracy actively participated in the development of medieval courtly culture, including cavalry warfare and knighthood, courtly food consumption and feasting, and courtly dress and ornamentation, resulting in increased social differentiation between those who could take part in the new courtly culture and those who could not. Thus, Denmark was never outside of Europe, and when Danish elites adopted medieval chivalric and courtly culture, they did so contemporaneously with their counterparts in other parts of Europe.

[Source : https://repositories.tdl.org/uh-ir/handle/10657/726]