Archives de catégorie : Islande / Iceland

McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-90

McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-900

Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. Pp. xv, 319, 8 figures, 6 maps, 3 tables. EUR 80.00.  ISBN: 978-2-503-54556-1.

  Reviewed by P. Holm, Trinity College Dublin

  In The Medieval review

Historians, archaeologists, and philologists have debated the character and extent of Scandinavian settlement like hardly any other phenomenon in Anglo-Saxon England, and more than seventy years after the publication of F.M. Stenton’s ground-breaking Anglo-Saxon England (Oxford, 1943) agreement on the main issues seems far away. McLeod therefore does all parties a great service by assembling and reviewing a good deal of the pieces that make up the puzzle. He boldly imagines some new pieces to make a full picture emerge. Many readers will value McLeod’s book for its up-to-date review, while the model suggested may encourage further research. Continuer la lecture de McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-90

Viking Archaeology in Iceland: Mosfell Archaeological Project

Zori, Davide and Jesse Byock. Viking Archaeology in Iceland: Mosfell Archaeological Project. Cursor Mundi, 20. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. Pp. xxvi, 256. $156.00 (paperback). 9782503544007 (paperback).

Reviewed by: Neil Price (University of Uppsala)

In The Medieval Review : https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/2022/20057/15.06.08.html?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

This book represents the full publication of a remarkable archaeological excavation project, conducted over multiple seasons in the Mosfell Valley and its central church and farm at Hrísbrú, a spectacular landscape environment not far from Reykjavík in south-western Iceland. Mosfell is well-known from the medieval saga literature, Iceland’s great national literary tradition, and is described in the anonymous saga of Egill Skalla-Grímsson as the location of the hero’s home. Egill is one of the most spectacular figures of the Viking period, even by the standards of a dramatic age, a quintessential warrior-poet, sorcerer and worshipper of the war-god Odin. While the veracity of the saga has long been open to question, the print-the-Legend story has a power all its own. Many Icelanders today are blood relatives of the man himself, and it is fair to say that any archaeological investigation of the reality behind the myth is a subject of national concern in this North Atlantic country of just over 300,000 people.

Continuer la lecture de Viking Archaeology in Iceland: Mosfell Archaeological Project

Dillmann, François-Xavier

Directeur d’études

École pratique des Hautes Études 

Continuer la lecture de Dillmann, François-Xavier

66 Manuscripts from the Arnamagnæan Collection

2015, 248 pp., hb
159 illustrations
ISBN 978-87-635-4264-7

http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=203654

This volume commemorates the three-hundred-fiftieth anniversary of the birth of the Icelandic scholar and antiquarian Árni Magnússon, who served as secretary of the Royal Archives and professor of Danish antiquities at the University of Copenhagen, in addition to building the most important collection of early Scandinavian manuscripts in existence.

The book presents descriptions of sixty-six manuscripts from the collection, one for each year of Magnússon’s life, complemented by high-quality color photographs, a comprehensive introduction to Magnússon’s life, and a chapter on book production in the medieval period.

Published in collaboration with the Arnamagnæan Institute at the Department of Nordic Research, Copenhagen and the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Reykjavík.

M.J. Driscoll is senior lecturer in Old Norse philology at the University of Copenhagen and head of the Arnamagnæan Institute.

Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir is head of the Manuscript Department at the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies in Reykjavík, Iceland.

Interpreting Eddic Poetry Project

Interpreting Eddic Poetry Project

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Carolyne Larrington (carolyne.larrington@sjc.ox.ac.uk), Judy Quinn (jeq20@cam.ac.uk)

Établissements principaux/Main institutions :

University of Oxford, University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Old Norse-Icelandic medieval literature is, alongside medieval French literature, the richest corpus of vernacular texts preserved from 850-1450. It incorporates an extraordinary range of genres, from early, oral poetry of praise and mourning to later indigenous prose romances making creative use of native and European narrative motifs. It also includes the unparalleled prose narratives of the sagas (many of which contain extensive quotations of poetry), contemporary histories and chronicles, poetry manuals and learned encyclopedic works, as well as a varied body of translated and native religious texts. Mediating insights into early Germanic and Scandinavian history, mythology, legend and society, and above all, crucial in reconstructing pre- and post-Conversion mentalités, the Norse literary heritage is becoming increasingly important in the study of medieval Europe.

The focus of this major new international research project is the unique genre of eddic poetry, a substantial body of literature preserved in a variety of disparate contexts. One major anthology survives, as well as single poems within compilation manuscripts and scattered quotations within treatises and a large number of sagas. The primary objectives of the ‘Interpreting Eddic Poetry’ Project are the redefinition of the extent and scope of this corpus and the reassessment of its significance in the light of recent advances in interdisciplinary research into different aspects of the culture of medieval Europe.

[Lien/Link : http://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/6447/Interpreting-Eddic-Poetry.html]

Matveeva Elizaveta, Reconsidering the tradition: the Odinic hero as saga-protagonist

Matveeva Elizaveta, Reconsidering the tradition: the Odinic hero as saga-protagonist, (dir. J. Jesch, University of Nottingham)

En cours depuis ?/In preparation since ?

Résumé/abstract :

My project centres upon the representation of late Icelandic saga characters that are connected with Odinic motifs, and are usually based upon an earlier tradition of depicting a mortal hero consecrated to Óðinn. The major examples of such characters include Sigmundr, Sinfjötli and Sigurðr of Völsunga saga that goes back to Eddic poetry, and the eponymous kings and their champions in Hrólfs saga kraka and Halfs saga ok Halfsrekka. The aim of my thesis is to look at the perception and interpretation of these traditional storylines and their pagan theme in saga narrative of the Christian era, from both literary-critical and historical points of view.

[Source : http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/research/groups/csva/research/doctoral-research.aspx]

Joanne Shortt Butler, Narrative structure and the individual in the Íslendingasögur : motivation, provocation and characterisation

Joanne Shortt Butler, Narrative structure and the individual in the Íslendingasögur : motivation, provocation and characterisation, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Université de Cambridge)

Continuer la lecture de Joanne Shortt Butler, Narrative structure and the individual in the Íslendingasögur : motivation, provocation and characterisation

Ramandi Maria Teresa, Latin and Norse in medieval Icelandic culture

Ramandi Maria Teresa, Latin and Norse in medieval Icelandic culture: a comparative analysis of some translated saints’ lives, (dir. E. Rowe, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis ?/In preparation since ?

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/people/graduates.htm]

Patterson Simon, The perception of prophecy in the ‘Íslendingasögur’

Patterson Simon, The perception of prophecy in the ‘Íslendingasögur’, (dir. J. Quinn, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis ?/In preparation since ?

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/people/graduates.htm]

Merkelbach Rebecca, Characters on the margin in Icelandic saga literature

Merkelbach Rebecca, Characters on the margin in Icelandic saga literature, (dir. J. Quinn, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/people/graduates.htm]

McCooey Bernadette, Farming practices in medieval Iceland

McCooey Bernadette, Farming practices in medieval Iceland, (University of Birmingham)

En cours depuis 2011/In preparation since 2011

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/cesma/members/graduate-research-students.aspx]

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230, (dir. N. Berend, E. van Houts, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/context-and-purpose-legendary-genealogies-northern-england-and-iceland-c]

Lugosch Nicola, Themes of feminine piety in Icelandic medieval literature

Lugosch Nicola, Themes of feminine piety in Icelandic medieval literature, (dir. D. Ashurst, University of Durham)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Résumé/abstract :

This thesis will examine motifs of morality in an attempt to identify a characteristically Icelandic model of ideal behaviour among Christian women. Because of the Icelandic Church’s relatively relaxed approach to sexuality and marriage, some of the typical hagiographic qualifications for sanctity as presented in popular Latin saints’ lives were transformed into a different set of standards as the Icelanders composed their own sagas of holy men and women. Further examination of these characters, as well as works produced for convents (such as Reynistarðarbók, which contains the relatively recently discovered Icelandic translation of the Book of Judith) will lead to a clearer understanding of native concepts of sanctity.

[Source : https://www.dur.ac.uk/english.studies/research/researchstudents/?id=9095]

Hitt Cory, Law and honour in medieval Iceland and France

Hitt Cory, Law and honour in medieval Iceland and France, (dir. J. Hudson, University of St Andrews)

En cours depuis ?/In preparation since ?

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://saims.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/people/current-phd-students/]

Cribb Vicky, ‘The expressible past’: a study of discursive modes in Íslendinga saga

Cribb Vicky, ‘The expressible past’: a study of discursive modes in Íslendinga saga, (dir. J. Quinn, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis ?/In preparation since ?

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/people/graduates.htm]