Archives de catégorie : Norvège / Norway

Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk

Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Stockholm)

Continuer la lecture de Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk

Beñat Elortza, A comparative analysis of the transformation of the Scandinavian military apparatus from a European perspective, c. 1035-1202

Beñat Elortza, A comparative analysis of the transformation of the Scandinavian military apparatus from a European perspective, c. 1035-1202, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’Aberdeen)

Continuer la lecture de Beñat Elortza, A comparative analysis of the transformation of the Scandinavian military apparatus from a European perspective, c. 1035-1202

Rebecca J. S. Cannell, Prospecting the physicochemical past : three dimensional geochemical investigation into the use of space in Viking Age sites in southern Norway using portable XRF

Rebecca J. S. Cannell, Prospecting the physicochemical past : three dimensional geochemical investigation into the use of space in Viking Age sites in southern Norway using portable XRF, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Bournemouth)

Continuer la lecture de Rebecca J. S. Cannell, Prospecting the physicochemical past : three dimensional geochemical investigation into the use of space in Viking Age sites in southern Norway using portable XRF

Louisa Taylor, Moderation and restraint in the North : ideals of elite conduct in High Medieval England, Norway and Denmark

Louisa Taylor, Moderation and restraint in the North : ideals of elite conduct in High Medieval England, Norway and Denmark, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (University College London)

Continuer la lecture de Louisa Taylor, Moderation and restraint in the North : ideals of elite conduct in High Medieval England, Norway and Denmark

Kjetil Loftsgarden, Marknadsplassar omkring Hardangervidda : ein arkeologisk og historisk analyse av innlandets økonomi og nettverk i vikingtid og mellomalder

Kjetil Loftsgarden, Marknadsplassar omkring Hardangervidda : ein arkeologisk og historisk analyse av innlandets økonomi og nettverk i vikingtid og mellomalder, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Bergen)

[Source : https://www.uib.no/nye-doktorgrader/112290/marknadsplassar-omkring-hardangervidda-i-vikingtid-og-mellomalder]

Synnøve Midtbø Myking, The French connection : Norwegian manuscript fragments of Fench origin and their historical context

Synnøve Midtbø Myking, The French connection : Norwegian manuscript fragments of Fench origin and their historical context, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Bergen)

Continuer la lecture de Synnøve Midtbø Myking, The French connection : Norwegian manuscript fragments of Fench origin and their historical context

Kaja Kollandsrud, Evoking the divine : the visual vocabulary of sacred polychrome wooden sculpture in Norway between 1100 and 1350

Kaja Kollandsrud, Evoking the divine : the visual vocabulary of sacred polychrome wooden sculpture in Norway between 1100 and 1350, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2018 (Université d’Oslo)

[Source : https://www.khm.uio.no/english/about/organisation/department-of-collection-management/staff/kajak/index.html]

Boestad, Tobias

Doctorant

Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV) 
Continuer la lecture de Boestad, Tobias

McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-90

McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-900

Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. Pp. xv, 319, 8 figures, 6 maps, 3 tables. EUR 80.00.  ISBN: 978-2-503-54556-1.

  Reviewed by P. Holm, Trinity College Dublin

  In The Medieval review

Historians, archaeologists, and philologists have debated the character and extent of Scandinavian settlement like hardly any other phenomenon in Anglo-Saxon England, and more than seventy years after the publication of F.M. Stenton’s ground-breaking Anglo-Saxon England (Oxford, 1943) agreement on the main issues seems far away. McLeod therefore does all parties a great service by assembling and reviewing a good deal of the pieces that make up the puzzle. He boldly imagines some new pieces to make a full picture emerge. Many readers will value McLeod’s book for its up-to-date review, while the model suggested may encourage further research. Continuer la lecture de McLeod, Shane. The Beginning of Scandinavian Settlement in England. The Viking ‘Great Army’ and Early Settlers, c. 865-90

Dillmann, François-Xavier

Directeur d’études

École pratique des Hautes Études 

Continuer la lecture de Dillmann, François-Xavier

66 Manuscripts from the Arnamagnæan Collection

2015, 248 pp., hb
159 illustrations
ISBN 978-87-635-4264-7

http://www.mtp.hum.ku.dk/details.asp?eln=203654

This volume commemorates the three-hundred-fiftieth anniversary of the birth of the Icelandic scholar and antiquarian Árni Magnússon, who served as secretary of the Royal Archives and professor of Danish antiquities at the University of Copenhagen, in addition to building the most important collection of early Scandinavian manuscripts in existence.

The book presents descriptions of sixty-six manuscripts from the collection, one for each year of Magnússon’s life, complemented by high-quality color photographs, a comprehensive introduction to Magnússon’s life, and a chapter on book production in the medieval period.

Published in collaboration with the Arnamagnæan Institute at the Department of Nordic Research, Copenhagen and the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Reykjavík.

M.J. Driscoll is senior lecturer in Old Norse philology at the University of Copenhagen and head of the Arnamagnæan Institute.

Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir is head of the Manuscript Department at the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies in Reykjavík, Iceland.

Karlsen Espen (éd.), Latin manuscripts of medieval Norway: studies in memory of Lilli Gjerløw

Karlsen Espen (éd.), Latin manuscripts of medieval Norway: studies in memory of Lilli Gjerløw, Oslo, Novus Press, 2013, 424 p. ISBN: 978-82-7099-722-0

Compte rendu par/Review by : Jenny Jochens

The Medieval Review

Date : 10 Mar 2014

This large and beautiful book takes an important step into a new discipline: the study of fragments of medieval manuscripts. Available in all Scandinavian countries, this resource is particularly abundant in Norway. The volume is also a festschrift to honor Lilli Gjerløw, the outstanding pioneer in this field who died at the age of 88 in 1998 and to whom I shall return. It is well know that England played a large role in the Christianization of Norway. Arriving in the ninth century, English missionaries succeeded in converting numerous numbers of the population and establishing churches. Missionaries and monks celebrated services in Latin using the liturgy they knew from home and requiring books that were brought from England. Eventually Norwegians themselves learned to procure manuscripts from abroad and to employ scribes who were taught by English professionals established in the country. Like other medieval countries, Norway in this way came to possess sizeable libraries attached to churches and monasteries that contained enduring parchment manuscripts written mainly in Latin but later also in Old Norse. In the beginning these books contained the liturgy required in the services, so that changes adopted by the international church can be followed in their texts. As Christianity became firmly established, Norwegians progressed into Patristic writings as well as the classic medieval authors whose texts they also acquired or copied.

Continue la lecture →

Busigyn Alexander, The Christian laws of medieval Norway

Busigyn Alexander, The Christian laws of medieval Norway: ecclesiastical tradition and legal innovation on the periphery of the Christian West, (dir. H. Antonsson, D. d’Avray, University College London)

En cours depuis 2011/In preparation since 2011

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/christian-laws-medieval-norway-ecclesiastical-tradition-and-legal]

Long Ann-Marie, The relationship between Iceland and Norway, c.870-1100

Long Ann-Marie, The relationship between Iceland and Norway, c.870-1100, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (dir. E. Johnston, University College Dublin)

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

Osborne Emily, Thinking outside the hall: the conceptual boundaries of Skaldic verse

Osborne, Emily, Thinking outside the hall: the conceptual boundaries of Skaldic verse, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. J. Quinn, University of Cambridge)

Royal courts, ships, battle-fields, farms, forests, churches, prisons – in the Icelandic and Norwegian sagas, a myriad of locations provide the backdrop in which skalds perform complex poetry for diverse audiences. Skaldic verses are generally framed as verbal responses to actual events: events which not only medieval sagas, but also modern scholars, have attempted to re-construct. This dissertation considers the discourse of performance employed in skaldic verses, yet looks beyond the familiar relationship between skald and royal patron, exploring instead the ways in which skalds engage various performance contexts both real and imagined, as well as multiple audiences who are present and absent, male and female, past and future, human and divine. Many non-encomiastic verses from the tenth to twelfth centuries communicate beyond the literal occasion to which they ostensibly respond by invoking absent, female and future audiences. Chapters One and Two consider ways in which lausavísur: associate audiences with specific locations by means of verb tense, apostrophe, deixis and periphrasis; reveal the skald’s concern for the preservation and dissemination of his verse within an oral poetic community; and are incorporated into retrospective, and often discrepant, narrative re-performances. Analysis of this dynamic discourse of performance and re-performance is informed by theoretical discussion, both medieval and modern, of deixis, apostrophe, oratorical solecism and narratology. After the twelfth century, the increasing influence of Christian devotional culture significantly altered the relationship between skald and audience. Religious poems were used for meditative reading and spiritual instruction in addition to (or in lieu of) public performance. Christian hermeneutics reframed medieval understandings of the relationships among the spoken, written and performative word. Chapters Three and Four consider ways in which traditional skaldic rhetoric, including deixis and periphrasis, was adapted to the ethnographic discourse of prayer, which negotiates among audiences human, divine, absent, prospective and immanent. Analysis in these chapters of the evolving discourse of performance and re-performance focuses on another female audience who is simultaneously present, absent and prospective – the Virgin Mary.

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.607815]