Archives de catégorie : Comptes rendus (ouvrages, soutenances) / Reviews (books, vivas)

Bauduin Pierre, Musin Alexander (dir.), Vers l’Orient et vers l’Occident

Bauduin Pierre, Musin Alexander (dir.), Vers l’Orient et vers l’Occident. Regards croisés sur les dynamiques et les transferts culturels des Vikings à la Rous ancienne, Caen, Publications du CRAHAM, 2014, 500 p. ISBN: 9782841334995

Compte rendu par/Review by : Yann Coz

La Cliothèque

Date : 22 Nov 2014

Fruit d’un programme de collaboration entre universitaires français et russes, cet ouvrage vise à faire le point sur les recherches menées ces dernières décennies et sur les nouvelles interprétations du passé normand en Normandie et en Rous ancienne, avec en complément des aperçus sur les îles britanniques et sur le monde scandinave. Sans rentrer dans le détail des contributions (rédigées en français et anglais), majoritairement archéologiques, on mettra l’accent ici sur quelques lignes de force et sur la remise en cause de certitudes bien ancrées sur le mouvement de colonisation qui affecte diverses régions d’Europe entre le VIIIe et la première moitié du XIe siècle.

Continue la lecture →

Gunnell Terry, Lassen Annette (dir.), The Nordic apocalypse: approaches to Völuspá and Nordic Days of Judgement

Gunnell Terry, Lassen Annette (dir.), The Nordic apocalypse: approaches to Völuspá and Nordic Days of Judgement, Turnhout, Brepols (Acta Scandinavica, vol. 2), 2013, XVIII-240 p. ISBN: 978-2-503-54182-2

Compte rendu par/Review by : Kevin J. Wanner

The Medieval Review

Date : 29 Sep 2014

The Nordic Apocalypse is an essay collection that, quoting Pétur Pétursson’s Introduction, « is designed to offer…insight into the ‘state of the art’ of Völuspá discussion at the start of the twenty-first century, » and which « has its roots in…papers given at a two-day conference held at…the National Museum of Iceland…[in] May 2008 » (xiv). It was the organizers’ hope that « focusing a symposium on a single Eddic poem rather than a wider genre might be a fruitful step forward in the field of Eddic studies » (xiv), thus suggesting that this volume supplements or improves on earlier collections that have considered either the subset of « mythological » or « heroic » eddic poems. Given that Völuspá is the most famous and studied of the eddic poems–anonymous, vernacular compositions that focus on gods and legendary heroes, and that are largely narrative, didactic, and/or dialogic in form–it is doubtlessly the member of this genre best poised to generate the interest needed to fuel a conference and essay collection. While individual eddic poems cannot be dated precisely, they are generally regarded as products of the ninth through thirteenth centuries, which means that as a group and in some cases as single works they bridge the pre-Christian and Christian eras. Völuspá has for a long while been dated to around the year 1000, the approximate date of Iceland’s conversion, though this estimation (or its significance) is challenged by some of this volume’s contributors. It is the first poem in the principal manuscript of eddic poetry, the Codex Regius or Konungsbók, which was compiled in Iceland ca. 1270. Two other Icelandic sources for Völuspá are Snorri Sturluson’s Edda, a guide to poetry and myth produced probably in the 1220s that quotes close to half of its stanzas, and the fourteenth-century Hauksbók, which contains a version with significant differences from that of the Codex Regius. In terms of content, Völuspá, or the « Prophecy (spá) of the Seeress (völva), » offers a synopsis, if one that is patchy and allusive, of the span of Norse mythic history, from the shaping of the present world to its cataclysmic end, and on into the emergence of a new one.

Continue la lecture →

Brown Shirley Ann, The Bayeux Tapestry. Bayeux, Médiathèque municipale: Ms. 1

Brown Shirley Ann, The Bayeux Tapestry. Bayeux, Médiathèque municipale: Ms. 1. A Sourcebook, Turnhout, Brepols (Publications of the Journal of Medieval Latin, vol. 9), 2013, CVI-316 p. ISBN: 9782503549170

Compte rendu par/Review by : George T. Beech

Francia-Recensio

Date : 18 Dec 2014

In 1988 Shirley Ann Brown (SAB) published a bibliography of scholarly writings on the Bayeux Tapestry, then in 2004 she updated this with regard to publications since 1988. Here she has come out with a bibliography of writings on the tapestry from the outset – the discovery of the hanging in the early 18th century – until the present along with several essays on related topics. She begins with a brief (p. XVII–XIX) « Physical Description » of the tapestry, then, just as she did in her 1988 Bibliography, she tells the fascinating story as to how this monument, apparently unknown to contemporaries from the 11th to the 17th century, was discovered in the cathedral of Bayeux early in the 18th: « The History of the Bayeux Tapestry » (p. XXI–LII). Step by step she recounts how successive generations of scholars down to the 20th century gradually came to appreciate how extraordinary this embroidery was as a work of art and historical document, the first finders having been unaware of how old and important it was.

Continue la lecture →

Nef Annliese, A companion to medieval Palermo: the history of a Mediterranean city from 600 to 1500

Nef Annliese, A companion to medieval Palermo: the history of a Mediterranean city from 600 to 1500, Leiden, Brill, 2013, 576 p. ISBN: 978-90-04-22392-9

Compte rendu par/Review by : Paul Oldfield

H-Net

Date : Mar 2014

In recent decades research on the medieval city has increasingly produced ever more holistic analyses informed by methodologies from across multiple disciplines. As an endeavour it has proved both enriching and hugely demanding. There are, arguably, few medieval cities more open to such inter-disciplinary and synthetic examination than the Sicilian city of Palermo; and there are, equally, few cities which offer up more challenges in doing so. Between 600 and 1500, Palermo felt the full effects of its location in a frontier zone where the worlds of Greek Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Latin Christianity all intersected. The city moved in and out of the orbit of different political hegemonies, its constantly fluctuating urban topography (street-plans, quarters, architecture) testament to that process. The city also experienced significant demographic shifts, economic up-turns and down-turns, and socio-cultural transformation as the linguistic, ethnic and religious make-up of the city was seemingly in a constant flux.

Continue la lecture →

Crosby Everett U., The king’s bishops: the politics of patronage in England and Normandy, 1066-1216

Crosby Everett U., The king’s bishops: the politics of patronage in England and Normandy, 1066-1216, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, XVIII-519 p. ISBN: 9781137307767

Compte rendu par/Review by : Hugh M. Thomas

The Medieval Review

Date : 10 May 2014

In his lengthy exploration of patronage and bishops in England and Normandy between the Norman Conquest and the death of King John, Everett U. Crosby has two main concerns, royal control of episcopal appointments and nepotism. His first chapter sets the stage by discussing medieval and modern views of bishops in the period. Crosby criticizes what he regards as snap judgments about individual medieval bishops made with inadequate evidence by some modern historians, warns against relying too heavily on medieval judgments that were based on impossibly high standards set by reformers, and argues that we should not focus too much on opposition between church and state. The second chapter consists of an overview of royal control of episcopal appointments, with most attention on the period up to Thomas Becket, and discusses the dual role of bishops as church officials and powerful lords. The third chapter provides a good deal of useful information, much of it set out in tables, on a variety of subjects, including episcopal appointments by royal reign; the background of bishops as regular clerics, royal clerks, or secular clerics; and the lengths of episcopal vacancies in various reigns. Scholars will find a large amount of research digested into a brief space here.

Continue la lecture →

Rety-Letouzey Catherine, Écrits et gestion du temporel dans une grande abbaye de femmes anglo-normande : la Sainte-Trinité de Caen (XIe-XIIIe siècle)

Rety-Letouzey Catherine, Écrits et gestion du temporel dans une grande abbaye de femmes anglo-normande : la Sainte-Trinité de Caen (XIe-XIIIe siècle), Thèse de doctorat soutenue  en 2011 (dir. Laurent Feller, Université de Paris I ; David Bates, University of East Anglia)

Résumé/abstract :

Cette thèse étudie les pratiques de gestion adoptées par les religieuses de La Trinité de Caen pour administrer leur vaste temporel anglo-normand durant les deux premiers siècles de l’histoire du monastère. Fondée vers 1059 par Guillaume le Conquérant et Mathilde de Flandres, l’Abbaye-aux-Dames a élaboré un cartulaire-censier (fin du XIIe siècle) et une série d’enquêtes (XIIe-XIIIe siècles) sans équivalent parmi les archives normandes, mais , qui s’insèrent Outre-Manche dans un corpus documentaire plus développé, bien connu et étudié. L’interrogation soulevée par la réalisation de ces documents dans cette abbaye normande constitue le point de départ de l’étude, qui explore la question des rapports entretenus entre compétences scripturaires et administratives, et qui tente de restituer les stratégies de gestion mises en place par les religieuses, et plus particulièrement leurs abbesses, durant les XIe-XIIIe siècles. Replacer cette documentation dans son contexte de production, celui d’une grande abbaye de femmes, dirigée par des abbesses puissantes et pleinement insérées dans l’univers des pratiques culturelles et administratives anglo-normandes, permet de mieux appréhender les enjeux de la réalisation des enquêtes et du cartulaire de l’Abbaye-aux-Dames. Comme tout grand seigneur ecclésiastique de cette époque, les abbesses de Caen témoignent d’une attention pointilleuse pour le respect de leurs prérogatives, mais aussi d’une conscience aiguë des réalités économiques, et d’une grande détermination dans leur démarche de préservation du temporel établi et organisé par la reine Mathilde, qui a souhaité être enterrée dans le chœur de l’église abbatiale.

Compte rendu par Isabelle Theiller sur le forum de Tabularia (08/12/2011)

Continuer la lecture de Rety-Letouzey Catherine, Écrits et gestion du temporel dans une grande abbaye de femmes anglo-normande : la Sainte-Trinité de Caen (XIe-XIIIe siècle)