Archives de catégorie : Projets en cours / Current projects

Projet «Antiquités de la terre Novgorod: une base de données électronique de découvertes archéologiques»

Le projet «Antiquités de la terre Novgorod: une base de données électronique de découvertes archéologiques» vise à la création et au développement d’un outil de ressources sur les informations obtenues lors de fouilles archéologiques des monuments antiques et médiévaux de terre Novgorod. La base de données contient des images numériques des découvertes et l’information la plus complète sur tous les sujets, et plus particulièrement sur les fouilles de Staraya Russa (XIe-XVIe siècle) dont on trouvera les rapports de fouilles. Elle offre un accès distant pour les chercheurs.

Source et accès : http://www.novsu.ru/archeology

History Books in the Anglo-Norman World c.1100-c.1300

History Books in the Anglo-Norman World c.1100-c.1300

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Laura Cleaver (cleaverl@tcd.ie)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

Trinity College Dublin

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries history (interpreted as both the recent past and a period stretching back to include the biblical narrative) seems to have become a major interest for both the educated elite and a growing audience who accessed ideas through vernacular texts. New chronicles and annals were produced, together with accounts of the histories of particular peoples, nations and subjects. At the same time, history was explored through images in books and other media. Much historical writing in this period dealt with issues of conquest and identity, which were often allied to geography, ethnicity or particular institutions. The ‘History Books’ project, funded by the Marie Curie Programme (FP7), will examine surviving medieval manuscripts in order to investigate the writing of history in areas controlled by the Anglo-Norman Empire, concentrating on the period 1100-1300. In particular the project will explore the use of images in the presentation of history in books and beyond.

[Lien/Link : https://www.tcd.ie/History_of_Art/research/history-books.php]

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Christopher Lewis (christopher.p.lewis@kcl.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

King’s College London

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The project will use innovative methods for interpreting Domesday Book to survey the whole of English landed society on the eve of the Norman Conquest in 1066, identifying landowners at all levels of society from the king and earls down to the parish gentry and even some prosperous peasants.

It may seem astonishing that this has never been done before, since the evidence has existed for more than 900 years. Domesday Book is the most complete survey of any medieval landed society, and provides a unique opportunity to reconstruct the distribution of landed wealth in eleventh-century England. It has been intensively studied, but until now progress has been blocked: the way pre-Conquest landholders are recorded creates major difficulties in identifying and distinguishing individuals of the same name; gathering, comparing, and mapping the evidence by hand has been prohibitively time-consuming; and evidence about landholders in other sources (such as chronicles and charters) has not been systematically pulled together.

Recent research on two fronts has transformed this situation. Publications by Stephen Baxter, Chris Lewis, and others (including in particular Dr Ann Williams, whose research constitutes one of the keystones of the project) have shown that Domesday Book can be used to make many more secure identifications of landowners than had ever been thought possible; and the imminent publication of ‘The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’ (PASE) will allow the evidence to be assembled, mapped, and compared with other sources much more efficiently. PASE will provide a prosopography – that is, a list of everything known – for every person recorded throughout the entire Anglo-Saxon period from the sixth century to the eleventh. It has been based at King’s and the University of Cambridge, and has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council over eight years in two phases. The second phase, which was published on 18 August 2010, extended PASE’s coverage of the eleventh century, and made a comprehensive database of Domesday landholders linked to mapping facilities freely available online.

‘Profile of a Doomed Elite’ will build on and refine PASE’s coverage of the late Anglo-Saxon nobility on the eve of its demise. It opens up the prospect of a major breakthrough in our knowledge of the Norman Conquest, one of the defining moments in English and European history.

The project will be implemented and published online by the King’s Department of Digital Humanities.

[Lien/Link : http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/research/proj/profile.aspx]

Interpreting Eddic Poetry Project

Interpreting Eddic Poetry Project

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Carolyne Larrington (carolyne.larrington@sjc.ox.ac.uk), Judy Quinn (jeq20@cam.ac.uk)

Établissements principaux/Main institutions :

University of Oxford, University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Old Norse-Icelandic medieval literature is, alongside medieval French literature, the richest corpus of vernacular texts preserved from 850-1450. It incorporates an extraordinary range of genres, from early, oral poetry of praise and mourning to later indigenous prose romances making creative use of native and European narrative motifs. It also includes the unparalleled prose narratives of the sagas (many of which contain extensive quotations of poetry), contemporary histories and chronicles, poetry manuals and learned encyclopedic works, as well as a varied body of translated and native religious texts. Mediating insights into early Germanic and Scandinavian history, mythology, legend and society, and above all, crucial in reconstructing pre- and post-Conversion mentalités, the Norse literary heritage is becoming increasingly important in the study of medieval Europe.

The focus of this major new international research project is the unique genre of eddic poetry, a substantial body of literature preserved in a variety of disparate contexts. One major anthology survives, as well as single poems within compilation manuscripts and scattered quotations within treatises and a large number of sagas. The primary objectives of the ‘Interpreting Eddic Poetry’ Project are the redefinition of the extent and scope of this corpus and the reassessment of its significance in the light of recent advances in interdisciplinary research into different aspects of the culture of medieval Europe.

[Lien/Link : http://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/6447/Interpreting-Eddic-Poetry.html]

The Isle of Man Viking Ancestry study

The Isle of Man Viking Ancestry study

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Mark Jobling (maj4@le.ac.uk), Simon James (stj3@le.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Leicester

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

This University of Leicester-funded study is being carried out by Hayley Dunn under the joint supervision of Professor Mark Jobling (Department of Genetics) and Dr Simon James (School of Archaeology) as part of research leading to a PhD degree. The aim of project is to look at the proportion of Viking ancestry among the inhabitants of the Isle of Man.

In this project we will exploit the power of the link we have previously shown between surnames and Y-chromosomal DNA (both of which are passed from father to son). We will use historical lists of surnames present on the Isle of Man in medieval times to recruit modern donor samples to mimic the population of the past. We will analyse Y chromosomes because these are linked with surnames, and then estimate proportions of Norwegian ancestry in these samples.

[Lien/Link : http://www2.le.ac.uk/projects/impact-of-diasporas/projects-1/IsleofMan]

Anglo Norman Dictionary Project

Anglo Norman Dictionary Project

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

D.A. Trotter (dtt@aber.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

Aberystwyth University

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Anglo-Norman, the form of French used in medieval Britain from 1066 until the mid-fifteenth century, is a major component of English. It is crucial to historians of English; as an important dialect of medieval French (in which the earliest French literary texts were written), it forms a key element in any account of the history of French vocabulary. The language of a major European power in the Middle Ages, Anglo-Norman was the medium for a vast array of historical, administrative, and legal documentation.

The Anglo-Norman Dictionary (1977-1992) is the only guide to this difficult vocabulary. The first half of this Dictionary is nothing like as comprehensive as the second half (from P onwards); the project’s ultimate aim is a complete revision, which will probably produce a dictionary two to three times the size of the first edition. The first part (A-E) was published and put online in 2005; with AHRC support, the project team has been progressively revising (for an online-only edition) from F onwards, with funding already secured as far as M.

[Lien/Link : http://www.anglo-norman.net/]

The Orkney Viking Heritage Project

The Orkney Viking Heritage Project

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Elizabeth Ashman Rowe (ea315@cam.ac.uk), Donna Heddle (donna.heddle@orkney.uhi.ac.uk), Judith Jesch (judith.jesch@nottingham.ac.uk), Carolyne Larrington (carolyne.larrington@sjc.ox.ac.uk), Christina Lee (christina.lee@nottingham.ac.uk), Heather O’Donoghue (heather.odonoghue@linacre.ox.ac.uk), Judy Quinn (jeq20@cam.ac.uk)

Établissements principaux/Main institutions :

University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, University of Nottingham, University of the Highlands and Islands

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Orkney Viking Heritage Project is a training programme for PhD students and early career researchers in the field of Old Norse-Icelandic and Viking Studies (ONIVS), which aims to extend academic research about the Viking diaspora and its tangible and non-tangible heritage in the British Isles. The Project addresses the evident skills gap in the Strategic Area of Heritage and engages with the Emerging Theme of Translating Cultures. It comprises a Preparatory Workshop in Oxford bringing together academics, young scholars and heritage professionals, and a Field School in Orkney providing hands-on experience of a heritage landscape, and will enable the translation of findings into accessible multi-media formats for public dissemination as exhibition resources. The theme of this year’s Midlands Viking Symposium is linked to the Project.

[Lien/Link : http://www.orkneyproject.org/]

The Conqueror’s Commissioners: Unlocking the Domesday Survey of South-Western England

The Conqueror’s Commissioners: Unlocking the Domesday Survey of South-Western England

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Julia Crick (julia.crick@kcl.ac.uk), Stephen Baxter (stephen.baxter@spc.ox.ac.uk), Peter Stokes (peter.stokes@kcl.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

King’s College London

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Exon Domesday is the earliest manuscript of William the Conqueror’s Domesday survey. Written in the South West nearly 1000 years ago, and housed at Exeter for most or all of its lifetime, it is the most complete and extensive record of the data collected by commissioners working across England at the end of the Conqueror’s reign. It records data for Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire before the process of editing and simplification which produced Great Domesday Book, the version of Domesday Book known to all and preserved at the National Archives at Kew. Exon Domesday provides unique information about the landscape and population of these counties in the generation before and after the Norman conquest of 1066. Researchers also hope that Exon Domesday will contain the key to understanding the Domesday survey itself, one of the most remarkable demonstrations of the effectiveness of royal government in the Middle Ages.

The interdisciplinary team, led by Professor Julia Crick (King’s College London), Dr Stephen Baxter (University of Oxford) and Dr Peter Stokes (King’s College London) and supported by a panel of international experts, will subject the manuscript and its contents to intensive scrutiny in an effort to reconstruct how the survey worked and how its results were recorded. Their project will create a freely available digital resource for the use of schools, local historians, and academic researchers across the world. High resolution photography will produce a digital surrogate of Exon Domesday; an accompanying Latin text and English translation will make the text available for the first time; a database will record the detailed findings of the research and a printed companion will also be published to provide a permanent record of the project. The project, designed in association with the Cathedral Library and Archives will be accompanied by public events at the cathedral, a series of talks in other cathedrals and across the South West.

[Lien/Link : http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/content/news/exon-domesday-book-unlocked-for-future-generations.ashx]

Crafting Networks in Viking Towns

Crafting Networks in Viking Towns

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Steve Ashby (steve.ashby@york.ac.uk), Søren M. Sindbæk (soren.sindbaek@york.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of York

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

This project brings together leading UK and Scandinavian archaeological specialists to undertake a comparative survey of crafted products and workshop assemblages from Viking-period towns in Northern Europe in order to clarify the role of long-distance interactions in early medieval urbanism. Striking similarities of material culture show that these places, though sometimes separated by hundreds of kilometres, were often as tightly related as neighbouring villages. Yet we have but a vague understanding of this communication. Did early medieval urban communities form a densely connected ‘global village’, or did they interact through selective, personal links to a few distant sites?

[Lien/Link : http://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/research/current-projects/cnvt/]

Acta of the Plantagenets

Acta of the Plantagenets

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Nicholas Vincent (n.vincent@uea.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The texts of original charters, writs, letters, and other documents, as well as copies and transcripts of them made between the twelfth century and the present, are being prepared for editions intended for publication, beginning with the acts of Henry II. In addition to those of Henry, the project has also collected the acts of Eleanor of Aquitaine, of Richard I, of John as Lord of Ireland and Count of Mortain, and of other members of the Plantagenet family.

[Lien/Link : http://www.britac.ac.uk/arp/acta.cfm]

The Mosfell Archaeological Project (MAP)

The Mosfell Archaeological Project (MAP)

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Jesse Byock (byock@humnet.ucla.edu)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of California Los Angeles

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Mosfell Archaeological Project is an interdisciplinary research project employing the tools of history, archaeology, anthropology, forensics, environmental sciences, and saga studies. The work will construct a picture of human habitation and environmental change in the region of Mosfell in southwestern Iceland. The Mosfell Valley (Mosfellsdalur), the surrounding highlands, and the lowland coastal areas are a Avalley system, that is, as an interlocking series of natural and man-made pieces, that beginning in the ninth-century settlement or landnám period developed into a functioning Viking Age, Icelandic community. Focusing on this valley system, our task is to unearth the prehistory and early history of the Mosfell region. We seek the data to provide an in-depth understanding of how this countryside or sveit evolved from its earliest origins.

The Mosfell Archaeological Project has implications for the larger study of Viking Age and later medieval Iceland, as well as perhaps for the north Atlantic world. Mosfellssveit encapsulates the major ecologies of Iceland: coastal, riverine, and highland. Culturally, the region is equally representative. In some ways it was a self-contained social and economic unit. In other ways, it was connected to the rest of Iceland, not least, through a network of roads, including an east-west route to the nearby meeting of the yearly Althing. With its coastal port at Leiruvogur, the region was in commercial and cultural contact with the larger Scandinavian and European worlds, possibly as far east as Constantinople.

The research, in reconstructing the early social history of the Mosfell Valley region, will integrate information on the changing periods of occupation. We will excavate individual sites, both secular and religious, and consider their placement in relationship to one another. We will examine the apportionment of open spaces and the utilization of common lands in the highlands and on the coast. Written, archaeological, and other scientific information will be integrated into this study as we construct a picture of early life.

The different specialists on our team will explore among other subjects the development of roads and paths, the importance of the ships landings at Leiruvogur, the changes over time in subsistence strategies, the state of health and disease in the Viking Age and later population, developments in building technics, and the usage of smaller activity areas, such as the sel, or summer dairy stations. Crucial tasks are finding the locations of early farm sites, the remains of turf buildings, roads, burials, agricultural enclosures, and port facilities before they are destroyed by modern construction or lost to human memory.

[Lien/Link : http://www.viking.ucla.edu/mosfell_project/]

The Charters of William II and Henry I

The Charters of William II and Henry I

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Richard Sharpe (richard.sharpe@history.ox.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Oxford

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The overall aim is to collect, edit, and interpret the royal acts issued in the names of two English kings, William II (reigned 1087 to 1100), and his brother Henry I (reigned 1100 to 1135), who was also duke of Normandy from 1106 until 1135. Royal acts, mainly charters but also writs and other letters, are the prime documentary source for the period, providing the means to understand the workings of the realm in a way not possible from chronicles and other narrative sources.

This edition differs from previous work on documents of this period by treating beneficiary archives as a unit. Although the king issued documents for his own reasons in many circumstances, for example royal proclamations, treaties, royal letters, and writs concerning fiscal administration, these rarely survive. What remains, therefore, is very largely the material in whose preservation someone had a direct interest. Most documents, even those representing the exercise of the king’s power such as the appointment of bishops or abbots, survive through the archive of the beneficiary who received and retained the documents. Different beneficiary archives tell different stories. The organization of the edition presents, for the most part, beneficiary archives with a headnote to explain the background, including the motivations behind seeking the king’s seal and the reasons for preservation.

When complete, the edition will include several hundred beneficiary archives. The acts are not distributed evenly between them: almost half are contained in just thirty archives. The files currently available on this site represent about an eighth of the material to be included in the final edition, which will be published as a multi-volume book.

[Lien/Link : https://actswilliam2henry1.wordpress.com/]

Scandinavian Runic-text Database

Scandinavian Runic-text Database

Établissement principal/Main institution : Uppsala University

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Scandinavian Runic-text Data Base  is a project involving the creation and maintenance of a database of runic inscriptions. The project’s goal is to comprehensively catalog runestones in a machine-readable way for future research. The database is freely available [1] via the Internet with a client program, called Rundata, for Microsoft Windows and ASCII text files for other operating systems.

[Lien/Link : http://www.runforum.nordiska.uu.se/samnord/]

The Medieval Nordic Legal Dictionary (MNLD)

The Medieval Nordic Legal Dictionary (MNLD)

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Stefan Brink (s.brink@abdn.ac.uk), Inger Larsson (inger.larsson@su.se), Ulrika Djärv (ulrika.djarv@su.se), Jeffrey Love, Christine Peel, Erik Simensen

Établissement principal/Main institution : Stockholm University

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Medieval Nordic Legal Dictionary (MNLD) is an ongoing project hosted by The Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism at the University of Stockholm. A general description of the project is available on the University MNLD Website. Generous funding has been provided by The Swedish Research Council for the creation of a dictionary of legal terminology used in the Nordic lands during the Middle Ages.MNLD is a part of the Medieval Nordic Laws (MNL) project based at the University of Aberdeen.

[Lien/Link : http://mdvlnld.wordpress.com]

Viking Torksey

Viking Torksey

Responsables du projet/Project leaders : Julian Richards (julian.richards@york.ac.uk), Dawn Hadley (d.m.hadley@sheffield.ac.uk)

Établissements principaux/Main institutions : University of York, University of Sheffield

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Torksey is widely known as a Viking winter camp from an entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for AD872. A growing body of archaeological evidence offers the potential of placing the site in its broader chronological and spatial context. Previous work has focussed on the pottery industry associated with an Anglo-Scandinavian town or burh. Recent metal detector finds have also suggested Torksey may be an Anglo-Saxon ‘productive site’, implying that Viking occupation must be seen in the context of pre-existing Saxon inhabitation. ‌‎‌‎

The aim of the project is to understand the role and significance of Torksey by plotting the chronological and spatial development of the various centres of activity, which have been tentatively identified through metal detecting.  These include a putative Anglo-Saxon riverine ‘beach market’, the Viking winter encampment and wider trading site, the Anglo-Scandinavian burh and the Torksey ware kilns. The project has major implications for wider understanding of the Viking Great Army and its interaction with local populations, the development of Anglo-Saxon burhs, and the evolving nature of trade and industry in the early medieval period, and its connections with power and ideology.

Funding has been provided by the British Academy, the Society of Antiquaries of London, and the Robert Kiln Trust.