Archives de catégorie : Projets en cours / Current projects

Variance of Njáls saga

Variance of Njáls saga

Responsable du projet/Project leader : Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir (salta@hi.is)Établissement principal/Main institution : Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum

Description :

The aim of the project is to examine the variance of Njáls saga from a linguistic, philological and literary perspective, both synchronically as regards the earliest manuscripts (which date from the 14th century), and diachronically by cataloguing changes that take place over time. Drawing on recent text-critical theories that emphasise the variance of the manuscript text, the project is focusing on neglected aspects of the Njála tradition such as the fragmentary medieval manuscripts and the little-studied manuscript Gráskinna, and the post-medieval manuscript tradition. In this way, the project seeks to show what the living tradition of Njáls saga was like at different stages of the saga’s transmission, what characterised the Njála text — and the material appearance of its manuscripts — at various junctures from the 14th century to the 19th century, and how these variations reflect the views and needs of scribes, patrons and users over time. Marked-up XML transcriptions of the medieval manuscript texts of the saga will form the basis for an electronic text archive of Njáls saga, a computer-assisted reconsideration of the Njála stemma published by Einar Ólafur Sveinsson in his 1953 monograph Studies in the Manuscript Tradition of Njálssaga (Reykjavík) and ultimately, a new digital edition of the saga.

The project is funded by Rannís (The Icelandic Research Fund) and is being conducted at the Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum (The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies) in Reykjavík, Iceland. The duration of the project is 3 years (2011-2013); the Principal Investigator is Dr Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir.

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Responsables du projet/Project leaders : Clunies Ross Margaret (mcr@arts.usyd.edu.au)

Établissement principal/Main institution : University of Sidney

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Norse-Icelandic Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages project aims to produce a new edition of the known corpus of skaldic verse, including runic inscriptions in metrical form. In practice this means editing all poetry supposed to be from earliest times until c. 1400, which does not belong to the collection in the Codex Regius of the Elder Edda and related collections. This is the first edition of the skaldic corpus from first principles since Finnur Jónsson’s Den Norsk-Islandske Skjaldedigtning (1912-15). It will be published in both book and electronic form as a critical edition with an English translation, editorial apparatus and notes. It will, however, in all cases re-examine the manuscript evidence for the poetic texts and their contexts.

The edition will be produced in eight volumes, each one based on distinct source categories arranged in assumed chronological order, so that the manuscript contexts in which the poetry has been preserved will be kept in view. This basis of selection, plus the inclusion of an English translation and notes, should prove useful to readers outside skaldic studies, such as historians, archaeologists and scholars of other medieval literatures, who have previously found skaldic verse rather inaccessible. The volume of runic poetry will also contain images of the objects on which the inscriptions were carved. There will be a ninth volume comprising various indices and a complete bibliography of works relevant to skaldic poetry.

The electronic edition will contain a range of resources and media: searchable text of the corpus, including variant readings; images and transcriptions of all base manuscripts and a great many other manuscripts; an interactive text linking all aspects of the apparatus; a range of linked resources, including information about manuscripts, prose sources and runic inscriptions; and a full concordance of poetic diction (kennings and heiti).

Volumes in print (Available directly from Brepols or through other distributors, including Amazon):
– Volume I: Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035 (2012)
– Volume II: Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300 (2009)
– Volume VII: Poetry on Christian Subjects (2007)

[Lien/Link : https://www.abdn.ac.uk/skaldic/db.php?if=default&table=home&val=&view=]

Converting the Isles

Converting the Isles

Responsables du projet/Project leaders : Roy Flechner (roy.flechner@ucd.ie), Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (mnm21@cam.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution : University Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Conversion to Christianity is arguably the most revolutionary social and cultural change that Europe experienced in late-antiquity and the early middle ages. Christianisation affected all strata of society and transformed not only religious beliefs and practices, but also the nature of government, the priorities of the economy, the character of kinship, and gender relations. It is against this backdrop that the network Converting the Isles was founded, in order to investigate social, economic, and cultural aspects of conversion in the early-medieval Insular world, covering different parts of Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and Iceland. Histories of conversion in the Insular world are bound up in an intricate web of connections that are well attested in contemporary documentary sources. For instance, we know of Irish missionaries operating in Britain and vice versa, there are cases in which religious centres enjoyed patronage from overseas kings, we occasionally see international political alliances being sealed by baptism, and from the late ninth century we encounter seafaring Vikings, whose ancestors were inimical to the church, beginning to serve as catalysts that contributed to the spread of the Christian religion. The combination of places that the network will focus on reflects our wish to establish a wide comparative framework that will highlight these cross-cultural connections, and cover areas that are of significance to the study of conversion in both the pre-Viking and the Viking era.The last two decades have seen a steady stream of studies devoted to the conversion history of Ireland, Britain and other parts of the Insular world. At the same time, the archaeological map of the region has been significantly augmented thanks to a surge in new finds, some of which—consisting especially of ecclesiastical sites and burials—shed valuable new light on the material culture of newly-converted communities, or communities in a state of religious and cultural transition. This fresh new data is important not only for what it can tell us about individual sites, but also for its cumulative value. Yet most research projects that set out to tap this data have either adhered closely to national and disciplinary boundaries, or else did not approach their subject matter comparatively and collaboratively. Converting the Isles will be different in that its main goal is to foster genuine interdisciplinary dialogue between historians, archaeologists and literary scholars. The interdisciplinary character of the network is meant not only to alert scholars to recent advancements that have been made in other fields, but also to search for ways in which highly specialised disciplines can be made to ‘talk’ to each other. This concern with interdisciplinarity from a methodological perspective, will be of relevance not just to medievalists, but to any historian engaged in interdisciplinary collaboration, and to novice students who are interested in gaining insights into the historian’s craft.

Old Norse Mythology Network and Conferences

Old Norse Mythology Network and Conferences

Responsables du projet/Project leaders : Pernille Hermann (norph@dac.au.dk) and Jens Peter Schjødt (jps@cas.au.dk)

Établissements principaux/Main institutions : University of Aarhus, University of Aberdeen

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

A network, based in Aarhus, has been in existence for some years, with several conferences. The network is very interdisciplinary, covering Old Norse language and literature, toponymy, runology, history of religions, ethnology, history, archaeology etc. The aim is to assemble the leading researchers in the field for conferences and to pursue a continuous discussion in the field of Old Norse mythology.

From next year these conferences will be held every other year in Aarhus and Aberdeen respectively, as cooperation between Nordisk Inst. and Inst. for religionshistorie at the University of Aarhus and Centre for Scandinavian Studies at the University of Aberdeen.

Settlements and Economies Around the Sea (SEAS). Maritime settlement, subsistence and economic histories around the Baltic Sea 500 BC – 1700AD. University of Helsinki, Finland

This project operates mainly inside three disciplines: archaeology, history, biology and linguistics (place names), but through cooperation it also incorporates elements of geology, climatology, and geophysics. A multidisciplinary approach, where different disciplines work in close cooperation, is used to reach the project’s objectives. The main objectives of the SEAS project are:

  1. To carry out a multidisciplinary study, analysis, interpretation, and publication of the development of settlement patterns, subsistence strategies, and economies in the maritime landscape during 500-1700 AD in the maritime landscape of Uusimaa and Finland Proper.
  2. To interpret the results from the perspective of the Baltic Sea region through close cooperation with parallel projects and institutions around the Baltic and North Sea.
  3. To jointly analyze and publish differences, generalizations and similarities within the broader area as a result of this cooperation.
  4. To promote maritime research and publish a general history of the areas around the Baltic and North Seas through a network of projects, institutes, and researchers.

[Lien/Link : http://vikingoldnorse.au.dk/mythology/]

The Viking DNA Project

The Viking DNA Project

Responsable du projet/Project leader : Turi King (tek2@le.ac.uk)Établissement principal/Main institution : University de Leicester

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

In this study we aim to look at the proportion of Viking ancestry in different parts of the north of England.

As a group of islands on the edge of a continent, we know that the British Isles have been on the receiving end of numerous migrations. The peopling has occurred in waves, from early Paleolithic settlers, through to the spread of farmers during the Neolithic, the arrival of Romans, Anglo-Saxons, and Danish and Norse Vikings. The modern population also includes likely trace contributions from other groups, too. The contributions of these various groups to the modern population of the British Isles is debated, and the purpose of this research project is to use genetic methods to contribute to our understanding of these past events. To carry out this research we can use surnames, and information about the birthplaces of recent ancestors.

Most people get their surnames from their father, and men also inherit specific genetic material (DNA) from their father too. This is the Y chromosome, which is responsible for making males. We know that a Y chromosome type can relate to a particular surname and we also know that most surnames are linked to particular regions. Thus by sampling men with specific surnames and/or with ancestry in particular locations, we should be able to draw up a map of the different types of Y chromosome types found in different regions in the past. We will look, for example, at regions where we suspect that there was a strong influence of Norse Vikings and compare the Y chromosomes found here with ones found in Norway.

The only criteria for participating has been that you are a man whose father’s father was born in the county of Cumbria, Lancashire, Cheshire, Yorkshire, Durham or Northumberland and that you have one of the surnames that are thought to be ‘northern’ surnames.

Stories for all time – The Icelandic fornaldarsagas

Stories for all time – The Icelandic fornaldarsagas
Responsable du projet/Project leader : Matthew James Driscoll (mjd@hum.ku.dk)Établissement principal/Main institution : University of CopenhagenProjet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The research project “Stories for all time” is based at Nordisk Forskningsinstitut (NFI), a research institute within the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Copenhagen. Its members of staff conduct research in the fields of Early Scandinavian language and literature, manuscript studies, dialectology, socio-linguistics, onomastics and runology. Funding is provided by the Velux foundation.

From March 2011, the three-year project will investigate the transmission of the fornaldarsögur from the middle ages onwards, mapping their production, dissemination and reception in relation to broader historical, social and cultural processes.

At the same time, the project will prepare electronic editions of some of the more important and/or interesting manuscripts in which the sagas are preserved, thereby making the texts available to researchers, students and other interested parties.

[Lien/Link : http://fasnl.ku.dk]

CNS – Corpus Nummorum Saeculorum IX-XI qui in Suecia Reperti Sunt [Catalogue of Coins from the Viking Age Found in Sweden]

CNS – Corpus Nummorum Saeculorum IX-XI qui in Suecia Reperti Sunt [Catalogue of Coins from the Viking Age Found in Sweden]

Responsable du projet/Project leader : Kenneth Jonsson (kenneth.jonsson@ark.su.se)Établissement principal/Main institution : Stockholm University

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

CNS is the abbreviation for a project intending to publish  all Viking coins found in Sweden (ca. 800-1140 ). Nine volumes have been printed so far, as well as the publications of a committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities until 2010. Since 2011, the project is entirely directed by the Numismatic Research Group of Stockholm University  and the future publications will only be published through our website , where some works are already available.
CNS är förkortningen för ett projekt där alla vikingatida myntfynd (ca 800-1140) i Sverige ska publiceras. Nio volymer har tryckts och fram t.o.m. 2010 organiserades publiceringen av en kommitté inom Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien. Fr.o.m. 2011 leds projektet helt av Numismatiska forskningsgruppen och den framtida publiceringen sker enbart via vår hemsida, där några fynd redan finns tillgängliga.

Nordic Medieval Laws (NML)

Nordic Medieval Laws (NML)

Responsable du projet/Project leader : Stefan Brink (s.brink@abdn.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution : Centre for Scandinavian Studies, University of Aberdeen

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

Aim of the project

The aim of the project is to analyse, edit, translate and comment upon all the Nordic provincial laws from the Middle Ages, for the first time. The output will be a series of 15 volumes with a translation of, and commentary upon, each law in English, and an online database consisting of facsimiles of the previously-published laws in Old Danish, Old Norwegian and Old Swedish.

Continuer la lecture de Nordic Medieval Laws (NML)