Archives de catégorie : Hiérarchies et groupes sociaux / Hierarchies and social groups

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Université d’Angers)

Continuer la lecture de Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Christopher Lewis (christopher.p.lewis@kcl.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

King’s College London

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The project will use innovative methods for interpreting Domesday Book to survey the whole of English landed society on the eve of the Norman Conquest in 1066, identifying landowners at all levels of society from the king and earls down to the parish gentry and even some prosperous peasants.

It may seem astonishing that this has never been done before, since the evidence has existed for more than 900 years. Domesday Book is the most complete survey of any medieval landed society, and provides a unique opportunity to reconstruct the distribution of landed wealth in eleventh-century England. It has been intensively studied, but until now progress has been blocked: the way pre-Conquest landholders are recorded creates major difficulties in identifying and distinguishing individuals of the same name; gathering, comparing, and mapping the evidence by hand has been prohibitively time-consuming; and evidence about landholders in other sources (such as chronicles and charters) has not been systematically pulled together.

Recent research on two fronts has transformed this situation. Publications by Stephen Baxter, Chris Lewis, and others (including in particular Dr Ann Williams, whose research constitutes one of the keystones of the project) have shown that Domesday Book can be used to make many more secure identifications of landowners than had ever been thought possible; and the imminent publication of ‘The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’ (PASE) will allow the evidence to be assembled, mapped, and compared with other sources much more efficiently. PASE will provide a prosopography – that is, a list of everything known – for every person recorded throughout the entire Anglo-Saxon period from the sixth century to the eleventh. It has been based at King’s and the University of Cambridge, and has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council over eight years in two phases. The second phase, which was published on 18 August 2010, extended PASE’s coverage of the eleventh century, and made a comprehensive database of Domesday landholders linked to mapping facilities freely available online.

‘Profile of a Doomed Elite’ will build on and refine PASE’s coverage of the late Anglo-Saxon nobility on the eve of its demise. It opens up the prospect of a major breakthrough in our knowledge of the Norman Conquest, one of the defining moments in English and European history.

The project will be implemented and published online by the King’s Department of Digital Humanities.

[Lien/Link : http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/research/proj/profile.aspx]

Walsh Rachel, The family network of the earls of Chester

Walsh Rachel, The family network of the earls of Chester, (dir. N. Tringham, P. Morgan, Keele University)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/family-network-earls-chester]

James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies

James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’Oxford)

Continuer la lecture de James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies

Moore Gavin, Earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237

Moore Gavin, Lordly power and lordship: earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237 (dir. K Hurlock, J. Roche, T. Adams, Manchester Metropolitan University)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/research-student-information/current-research-student-profiles/history/]

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230, (dir. N. Berend, E. van Houts, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/context-and-purpose-legendary-genealogies-northern-england-and-iceland-c]

Kilpi Hanna, The role of lesser aristocratic women in 12th-century England

Kilpi Hanna, The role of lesser aristocratic women in 12th-century England, (dir. S. Marritt, J. Smith, University of Glasgow)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Résumé/abstract :

My thesis examines the place of lesser aristocratic women in twelfth-century England. Lesser aristocratic women have often been overlooked in modern historiography because it has often been assumed that there is very little evidence of them. Instead, the experiences of all women have been seen as represented in the more substantial evidence of elite secular and religious women. My thesis questions this by focusing on lesser aristocratic women in England, particularly Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Yorkshire, for which charters provided the main material.

[Source : http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/humanities/research/students/hannakilpi/index.html]

Gonzalez Lillian Cespedes, The representation of Norse women in medieval textual sources

Gonzalez Lillian Cespedes, The representation of Norse women in medieval textual sources and modern visual media, (dir. E. Woodacre, R. Lavelle, University of Winchester)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/representation-norse-women-medieval-textual-sources-and-modern-visual]

Dymond Alexander, Royal/ducal demesne in England and Normandy in the eleventh century

Dymond Alexander, Royal/ducal demesne in England and Normandy in the eleventh century, (dir. Stephen Baxter, University of Oxford)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.ohgn.org/student?sso=CORP2388]

Carlsson Edward, Relationships and networks of power amongst 11th- and 12th-century Norwegian aristocracy

Carlsson Edward, Relationships and networks of power amongst 11th- and 12th-century Norwegian aristocracy, (dir. T. Wills, M. Gelting, University of Aberdeen)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/relationships-and-networks-power-amongst-11th-and-12th-century-norwegian]

Boston Hannah, The honorial baronage of the North Midlands in the long 12th century

Boston Hannah, Lordship and community: the honorial baronage of the North Midlands in the long 12th century, (dir. G. Garnett, University of Oxford)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/lordship-and-community-honorial-baronage-north-midlands-long-12th-century]

The Conqueror’s Commissioners: Unlocking the Domesday Survey of South-Western England

The Conqueror’s Commissioners: Unlocking the Domesday Survey of South-Western England

Responsables du projet/Project leaders :

Julia Crick (julia.crick@kcl.ac.uk), Stephen Baxter (stephen.baxter@spc.ox.ac.uk), Peter Stokes (peter.stokes@kcl.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

King’s College London

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The Exon Domesday is the earliest manuscript of William the Conqueror’s Domesday survey. Written in the South West nearly 1000 years ago, and housed at Exeter for most or all of its lifetime, it is the most complete and extensive record of the data collected by commissioners working across England at the end of the Conqueror’s reign. It records data for Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire before the process of editing and simplification which produced Great Domesday Book, the version of Domesday Book known to all and preserved at the National Archives at Kew. Exon Domesday provides unique information about the landscape and population of these counties in the generation before and after the Norman conquest of 1066. Researchers also hope that Exon Domesday will contain the key to understanding the Domesday survey itself, one of the most remarkable demonstrations of the effectiveness of royal government in the Middle Ages.

The interdisciplinary team, led by Professor Julia Crick (King’s College London), Dr Stephen Baxter (University of Oxford) and Dr Peter Stokes (King’s College London) and supported by a panel of international experts, will subject the manuscript and its contents to intensive scrutiny in an effort to reconstruct how the survey worked and how its results were recorded. Their project will create a freely available digital resource for the use of schools, local historians, and academic researchers across the world. High resolution photography will produce a digital surrogate of Exon Domesday; an accompanying Latin text and English translation will make the text available for the first time; a database will record the detailed findings of the research and a printed companion will also be published to provide a permanent record of the project. The project, designed in association with the Cathedral Library and Archives will be accompanied by public events at the cathedral, a series of talks in other cathedrals and across the South West.

[Lien/Link : http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/content/news/exon-domesday-book-unlocked-for-future-generations.ashx]

Acta of the Plantagenets

Acta of the Plantagenets

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Nicholas Vincent (n.vincent@uea.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The texts of original charters, writs, letters, and other documents, as well as copies and transcripts of them made between the twelfth century and the present, are being prepared for editions intended for publication, beginning with the acts of Henry II. In addition to those of Henry, the project has also collected the acts of Eleanor of Aquitaine, of Richard I, of John as Lord of Ireland and Count of Mortain, and of other members of the Plantagenet family.

[Lien/Link : http://www.britac.ac.uk/arp/acta.cfm]

Crosby Everett U., The king’s bishops: the politics of patronage in England and Normandy, 1066-1216

Crosby Everett U., The king’s bishops: the politics of patronage in England and Normandy, 1066-1216, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, XVIII-519 p. ISBN: 9781137307767

Compte rendu par/Review by : Hugh M. Thomas

The Medieval Review

Date : 10 May 2014

In his lengthy exploration of patronage and bishops in England and Normandy between the Norman Conquest and the death of King John, Everett U. Crosby has two main concerns, royal control of episcopal appointments and nepotism. His first chapter sets the stage by discussing medieval and modern views of bishops in the period. Crosby criticizes what he regards as snap judgments about individual medieval bishops made with inadequate evidence by some modern historians, warns against relying too heavily on medieval judgments that were based on impossibly high standards set by reformers, and argues that we should not focus too much on opposition between church and state. The second chapter consists of an overview of royal control of episcopal appointments, with most attention on the period up to Thomas Becket, and discusses the dual role of bishops as church officials and powerful lords. The third chapter provides a good deal of useful information, much of it set out in tables, on a variety of subjects, including episcopal appointments by royal reign; the background of bishops as regular clerics, royal clerks, or secular clerics; and the lengths of episcopal vacancies in various reigns. Scholars will find a large amount of research digested into a brief space here.

Continue la lecture →

Middlemass Rachel, Bodies of men: manhood and masculinity in England and northern France, c.1100-c.1250

Middlemass Rachel, Bodies of men: manhood and masculinity in England and northern France, c.1100-c.1250, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. R. Balzaretti, J. Barrow, University of Nottingham)

Résumé/abstract :

This study responds to a gap in the existing historiography of medieval men and masculinities around the relationships between corporeality, gender identity, group membership. and social inequality. It aims primarily to elucidate the significance of the physical body to medieval masculine ideals and its role in processes of social categorisation which privileged most men over most women, and some men over others. In particular. I focus here on the ways in which culturally specific – but surprisingly coherent – discourses about and narrative representations of the body were used to construct prototypical models of manhood. principally via claims of polarisation from and superiority to corporeally distinct « others’. The analysis presented here is undertaken within a framework which borrows from anthropological and sociological methodologies, incorporating a dual focus on the ‘natural’ or essential, as well as the socially-constructed and discursive facets of the body. The body is viewed throughout as playing a simultaneously representational and instrumental role in the construction of both individual and collective identities. It is understood here both as a vehicle for the expression of those identities and as an active agent in their production; both a product of the behavioural codes prescribed for men and a site for and resource in men’s alignment with or resistance to these codes. It is likewise accorded agency in the unequal attribution of social status to both individual male bodies and collectives thereof. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of multiple ‘capitals’, the body is treated as a cultural asset whose unequal distribution, like any other form of capital, is hypothesised here to have played a role in the institution and maintenance of deep social divisions between medieval men.

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595315]