Archives de catégorie : Normes et sociétés / Norms and societies

Duncan Dale Roderick Thomas, Berserkir : a re-examination of the phenomenon in literature and life

Duncan Dale Roderick Thomas, Berserkir : a re-examination of the phenomenon in literature and life, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (dir. J. Jesch, Université de Nottingham)

Résumé/abstract :

This thesis discusses whether berserkir really went berserk. It proposes revised paradigms for berserkir as they existed in the Viking Age and as depicted in Old Norse literature. It clarifies the Viking Age berserkr as an elite warrior whose practices have a function in warfare and ritual life rather than as an example of aberrant behaviour, and considers how usage of PDE ‘berserk’ may affect the framing of research questions about berserkir through analysis of depictions in modern popular culture. The analysis shows how berserksgangr has received greater attention than it warrants with the emphasis being on how berserkir went berserk. A critical review of Old Norse literature shows that berserkir do not go berserk, and suggests that berserksgangr was a calculated form of posturing and a ritual activity designed to bolster the courage of the berserkr.

It shows how the medieval concept of berserkir was more nuanced and less negative than is usually believed, as demonstrated by the contemporaneous existence in narratives of berserkir as king’s men, hall challengers, hólmgöngumenn, Viking raiders and Christian champions, and by the presence of men with the byname berserkr in fourteenth-century documents. Old Norse literature is related to pre-Viking Age evidence to show that warriors wearing wolfskins existed and can be related to berserkir, thus making it possible to produce models for Viking Age and medieval concepts of berserkir.

The modern view of berserkir is analysed and shows that frenzy is the dominant attribute, despite going berserk not being a useful attribute in Viking Age warfare which relied upon men holding a line steady rather than charging individually.

The thesis concludes that ON berserkr may be best translated as PDE ‘champion’, while PDE ‘berserker’ describes the type of uncontrollable warrior most commonly envisaged when discussing berserkir.

[Source : http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/28819/]

Thomas Elizabeth, « We have nothing more valuable in our treasury » : royal marriage in England, 1154-1272

Thomas Elizabeth, « We have nothing more valuable in our treasury » : royal marriage in England, 1154-1272, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2010, (dir. J. Hudson, Université de St Andrews)

Résumé/abstract :

That kings throughout the entire Middle Ages used the marriages of themselves and their children to further their political agendas has never been in question. What this thesis examines is the significance these marriage alliances truly had to domestic and foreign politics in England from the accession of Henry II in 1154 until the death of his grandson Henry III in 1272. Chronicle and record sources shed valuable light upon the various aspects of royal marriage at this time: firstly, they show that the marriages of the royal family at this time were geographically diverse, ranging from Scotland and England to as far abroad as the Empire, Spain, and Sicily, Most of these marriages were based around one primary principle, that being control over Angevin land-holdings on the continent. Further examination of the ages at which children were married demonstrates a practicality to the policy, in that often at least the bride was young, certainly young enough to bear children and assimilate into whatever land she may travel to. Sons were also married to secure their future, either as heir to the throne or the husband of a wealthy heiress. Henry II and his sons were almost always closely involved in the negotiations for the marriages, and were often the initiators of marriage alliances, showing a strong interest in the promotion of marriage as a political tool. Dowries were often the centre of alliances, demonstrating how much the bride, or the alliance, was worth, in land, money, or a combination of the two. One of the most important aspects for consideration though, was the outcome of the alliances. Though a number were never confirmed, and most royal children had at least one broken proposal or betrothal before their marriage, many of the marriages made were indeed successful in terms of gaining from the alliance what had originally been desired.

[Source : https://research-repository.st-andrews.ac.uk/handle/10023/2001]

Charpentier Ljungqvist Fredrik, Kungamakten och lagen : En jämförelse mellan Danmark, Norge och Sverige under högmedeltiden

Charpentier Ljungqvist Fredrik, Kungamakten och lagen : En jämförelse mellan Danmark, Norge och Sverige under högmedeltiden [Kingship and Law : A Comparison between Denmark, Norway, and Sweden in the High Middle Ages], Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2014, (dir. O. Ferm, Université de Stockholm)

Résumé/abstract :

The dissertation is a comparative study of the expansion of law-regulated royal power in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden c. 1150–1350. The aim is to examine how the king’s judicial and military authority and functions, and their effect on the power position of the regional legal assembly and the church, is expressed and how it changed over time in the extant law material. The starting point is the pan-European consolidation of royal power in the High Middle Ages, and the dissertation considers international research on the medieval state formation process and its driving forces. The processual concepts of centralization, institutionalization, hierarchization, and territorialization occupy a central place in the analysis.

Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish laws all reflect a significant increase in royal power. A growing number of societal functions were vested in the increasingly institutionalized kingship, and there was a growth in its power resources. At the same time, it is possible to identify crucial inter-Scandinavian differences. A main finding is that the law-regulated royal power, in most respects, was strongest in Norway and weakest in Sweden. Another important conclusion is that executive royal power first emerged after the judicial and also legislative power had already to a large extent come under royal control.

It is demonstrated that Scandinavian kingship in the High Middle Ages was characterized by increasingly centralized and institutionalized territorially based power, with a greater monopoly on the use of legitimate force, and thereby strengthened the ongoing state formation process. The expansion of law-regulated royal power primarily concerned the judicial sphere and only secondarily the military and fiscal spheres. That state formation was driven by judicial development rather than militarization is also shown by the fact that Norway, despite having the least professionalized and resource-demanding armed forces, was the Scandinavian country with the most centralized and institutionalized royal power.

[Source : http://su.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A737397&dswid=3935]

Mémoire et diplomatique : l’édition des actes des évêques de Sées (911-1220)

Mémoire et diplomatique : l’édition des actes des évêques de Sées (911-1220)

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Richard Allen (richard.allen@history.ox.ac.uk)

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

L’objectif du projet est simple : collecter et éditer d’une manière critique les actes donnés par les évêques du diocèse de Sées pendant la période allant de 911 jusqu’en 1220 en vue de mettre l’ensemble à disposition des chercheurs sous forme d’une publication traditionnelle ainsi qu’informatique. Bénéficiaire d’un financement (en post-doctorat) de l’Université de Caen Basse-Normandie durant l’année 2013, le travail se poursuit aujourd’hui dans le cadre du projet Corpus des actes épiscopaux normands (XIe-XIIIe siècle) développé au Centre Michel de Boüard-CRAHAM (UMR 6273). Le dépouillement systématique de l’essentiel des fonds d’archives conservés dans les dépôts départementaux et nationaux, tant en France qu’en Angleterre, a révélé l’existence de presque 400 actes, dont 111 nous sont parvenus en original. Pouvoir les consulter sera d’un profit considérable pour la connaissance de plusieurs aspects de l’histoire médiévale du diocèse de Sées ainsi que de la Normandie plus largement. Ils fournissent de nombreux renseignements sur la fonction épiscopale, sur l’action épiscopale dans l’administration du diocèse, sur le fonctionnement de la juridiction de l’évêque, sur les fondations d’abbayes, de prieurés et d’institutions charitables ou hospitalières, et sur les mutations socio-économiques qu’a connues la région au cours de ces siècles décisifs du Moyen Âge. Le diocèse de Sées, dont les limites s’étendaient au-delà des marges méridionales de la Normandie, offre aussi un sujet de recherches plein d’intérêt en ce qui concerne l’évolution des marches normandes, et les actes offrent des aperçus nouveaux sur les familles aristocratiques de cette zone frontière stratégique chevauchant les frontières des comtés du Maine et de Blois et Chartres. Ils contiennent enfin une masse de données toponymiques et leur édition constitue donc un apport important pour la toponymie et l’anthroponymie normande. Les financements reçus en 2013 ont également permis d’avancer le balisage XML des actes, ce qui permettra la publication du corpus sur double support dans le cadre du projet E-Cartae, dont les schémas d’encodage XML-TEI sont pris en charge par la chaîne d’édition multi-support des Presses Universitaires de Caen.

Lebouteiller Simon, Faire la paix dans la Scandinavie médiévale.

Lebouteiller Simon, Faire la paix dans la Scandinavie médiévale. Recherche sur les formes de pacification et les rituels de paix dans le monde scandinave au Moyen Âge (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle) (dir. P. Bauduin, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie – co-directeur : J.-M. Maillefer, Université de Paris IV)

En cours depuis 2011 /In preparation since 2011

Résumé/abstract :

La période médiévale a été marquée par l’expansion du pouvoir royal en Europe du Nord et l’émergence des Scandinaves sur la scène politique européenne à travers des raids croissants et la conquête de territoires sur le continent. Les élites nordiques ont ainsi été impliquées dans de nombreux conflits armés, ceux-ci étant alors le plus souvent suivis de processus de pacification durant lesquels les conditions du retour à la paix étaient déterminées.

Notre recherche consistera à nous interroger sur le déroulement et la composition des mouvements de résolution de conflits politiques dans le monde scandinave du VIIIe au XIIIe siècle. Ainsi, quelles ont été les techniques diplomatiques employées par les anciens Scandinaves afin d’assurer les négociations entre partis ? Quelles ont été les modalités de ces accords de paix ? À quels rituels a-t-on eu recours afin de consacrer la cessation des conflits ?

Au regard de la vaste documentation nous permettant d’étudier l’histoire de ces régions septentrionales (sagas islandaises, poésie scaldique, lois provinciales, chroniques, annales…), il s’agira notamment de replacer les pratiques nordiques dans le contexte culturel européen et de définir leurs spécificités et leurs similitudes avec les usages diplomatiques de leurs adversaires. Ce point nous mènera alors à déterminer si ces éléments ont éventuellement influencé les relations entre ces différents protagonistes et la nature des accords de paix qu’ils ont pu passer.

De même, un second axe sera d’étudier les évolutions des techniques de pacification dans ce contexte de développement du christianisme et de l’influence du monde chrétien sur les structures culturelles et politiques des sociétés scandinaves. Enfin, on tentera d’examiner la représentation des idées de paix et de « non-paix » dans la littérature nordique et de révéler la signification et les valeurs de ces notions dans ces cultures en transition.

[source : http://w3.unicaen.fr/ufr/histoire/craham/spip.php?article584 ]

Groud-Cordray Claude, L’aristocratie aux frontières occidentales du duché de Normandie, face à la Bretagne et au Maine (Xe-XIIIe siècles)

Groud-Cordray Claude, L’aristocratie aux frontières occidentales du duché de Normandie, face à la Bretagne et au Maine (Xe-XIIIe siècles), (dir. V. Gazeau, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie)

En cours depuis 2011/In preparation since 2011

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[source :
http://w3.unicaen.fr/ufr/histoire/craham/spip.php?article587]

Mauduit Christophe, Princes et réseaux de pouvoir dans l’Ouest de la Normandie (XIe -XIIIe siècle)

Mauduit Christophe, Princes et réseaux de pouvoir dans l’Ouest de la Normandie (XIe -XIIIe siècle), (dir. Veronique Gazeau, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie).

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Résumé/abstract :

L’ouest de la Normandie fait souvent figure de parent pauvre dans l’historiographie de la Normandie médiévale. Les seigneurs, laïcs et ecclésiastiques, influents de l’ouest de la Normandie sont mal connus. Leurs installations, souvent initiées par le pouvoir royal, et leurs motivations politiques, personnelles ou religieuses, ainsi que leurs relations n’ont pas été étudiés. Commencer l’étude dans les années 1040 permet d’étudier les transformations politiques engagées par le duc de Normandie, Guillaume, dans l’ouest de la Normandie, tant du point de vue religieux (évêques et fondations d’abbaye) que du point de vue féodal (réorganisation de la hiérarchie seigneuriale). Les rois d’Angleterre, duc de Normandie continuent jusque 1204 d’influer sur cette zone, certes avec des développements et des fluctuations selon les rois : Henri Ier, ancien comte du Cotentin reste toujours proche de cette région, alors que Jean sans terre, pourtant ancien comte de Mortain, n’a pas entretenu de lien particulier. À partir de 1137-1138, les seigneurs s’affirment et mènent des stratégies personnelles aux dépens des princes. Un second tournant débute dans les années 1193-1195. A partir de 1204, la conquête capétienne marque une nouvelle évolution dans les rapports entre le souverain et les détenteurs de pouvoirs locaux. Mais éloignée de la frontière anglo-française, c’est surtout à partir des années 1248-1254, que l’influence royale se fait sentir, notamment avec l’affirmation du pouvoir des représentants du roi, les baillis, qui encadrent progressivement les privilèges des seigneurs laïcs comme ecclésiastiques. Le règne de Philippe III (1270-1285) finit d’intégrer complètement l’ouest de la Normandie dans le domaine royal français, même si dans les textes la différence entre Normannia et Francia est toujours présente. L’ouest de la Normandie, expression volontairement imprécise, correspond toutefois à un espace cohérent. L’aristocratie qui domine cet espace met en place des stratégies matrimoniales au cœur de cette zone, on parle parfois d’aristocratie « bajocasso-cotentinaise ». Le comte de Mortain, comme d’autres seigneurs, est le bienfaiteur d’abbayes tant dans le Cotentin, dans le Bessin que dans l’Avranchin. Au XIIIe siècle, cette cohérence est renforcée par la création du bailliage du Cotentin qui englobe le diocèse de Coutances, d’Avranches, et d’une partie de celui de Bayeux. Les îles anglo-normandes sont comprises dans cette étude, puisque l’archidiaconé des îles dépend de l’évêché de Coutances, et les abbayes normandes y sont fortement implantées. L’historiographie normande a peu traité ces espaces, surtout dans une réflexion sur la volonté des princes d’y affirmer leur présence et leur pouvoir, et sur celles des aristocrates de s’affranchir de l’autorité de ces derniers. Pourtant pour répondre à ces interrogations les sources sont nombreuses, les 21 abbayes couvrant notre espace, ont presque toutes laissées de nombreux actes de la pratique, pour la plupart inédit, qui éclairent les réseaux de pouvoirs. A côté de ces milliers de chartes, les autres sources diplomatiques (actes des ducs de Normandie, des rois de France), les sources littéraires, mais aussi la sigillographie et l’archéologie permettent de discuter ce que l’on sait aujourd’hui de l’intégration d’un territoire à un royaume, et aussi de mieux appréhender la vision que les seigneurs avaient de leur pouvoir, et que les princes avaient de ces territoires.

[source : http://www.theses.fr/s116672]

Berardi Riccardo, Féodalité laïque et seigneurie ecclésiastique en Italie du Sud au Moyen Age : la Calabre des Normands à la guerre des Vêpres (1282)

Berardi Riccardo, Féodalité laïque et seigneurie ecclésiastique en Italie du Sud au Moyen Age : la Calabre des Normands à la guerre des Vêpres (1282), (dir. Annick Peters Custot – Université de Saint-Etienne).

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[source : http://www.theses.fr/s105690]

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Université d’Angers)

Continuer la lecture de Papin Elodie, L’aristocratie laïque du Glamorgan et l’abbaye de Margam (1147-1283)

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Christopher Lewis (christopher.p.lewis@kcl.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

King’s College London

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The project will use innovative methods for interpreting Domesday Book to survey the whole of English landed society on the eve of the Norman Conquest in 1066, identifying landowners at all levels of society from the king and earls down to the parish gentry and even some prosperous peasants.

It may seem astonishing that this has never been done before, since the evidence has existed for more than 900 years. Domesday Book is the most complete survey of any medieval landed society, and provides a unique opportunity to reconstruct the distribution of landed wealth in eleventh-century England. It has been intensively studied, but until now progress has been blocked: the way pre-Conquest landholders are recorded creates major difficulties in identifying and distinguishing individuals of the same name; gathering, comparing, and mapping the evidence by hand has been prohibitively time-consuming; and evidence about landholders in other sources (such as chronicles and charters) has not been systematically pulled together.

Recent research on two fronts has transformed this situation. Publications by Stephen Baxter, Chris Lewis, and others (including in particular Dr Ann Williams, whose research constitutes one of the keystones of the project) have shown that Domesday Book can be used to make many more secure identifications of landowners than had ever been thought possible; and the imminent publication of ‘The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’ (PASE) will allow the evidence to be assembled, mapped, and compared with other sources much more efficiently. PASE will provide a prosopography – that is, a list of everything known – for every person recorded throughout the entire Anglo-Saxon period from the sixth century to the eleventh. It has been based at King’s and the University of Cambridge, and has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council over eight years in two phases. The second phase, which was published on 18 August 2010, extended PASE’s coverage of the eleventh century, and made a comprehensive database of Domesday landholders linked to mapping facilities freely available online.

‘Profile of a Doomed Elite’ will build on and refine PASE’s coverage of the late Anglo-Saxon nobility on the eve of its demise. It opens up the prospect of a major breakthrough in our knowledge of the Norman Conquest, one of the defining moments in English and European history.

The project will be implemented and published online by the King’s Department of Digital Humanities.

[Lien/Link : http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/research/proj/profile.aspx]

Walsh Rachel, The family network of the earls of Chester

Walsh Rachel, The family network of the earls of Chester, (dir. N. Tringham, P. Morgan, Keele University)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/family-network-earls-chester]

Stevenson John, The Plantagenet administration of Normandy, 1144-1204

Stevenson John, The Plantagenet administration of Normandy, 1144-1204, (dir. D. Power, Swansea University)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/plantagenet-administration-normandy-1144-1204]

James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies

James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’Oxford)

Continuer la lecture de James Moore, The Norman aristocracy in the long eleventh century : three case studies

Moore Gavin, Earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237

Moore Gavin, Lordly power and lordship: earls Ranulf III and John le Scot of Chester, a case study, c. 1181-1237 (dir. K Hurlock, J. Roche, T. Adams, Manchester Metropolitan University)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/research-student-information/current-research-student-profiles/history/]

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230

Lunga Peter, The context and purpose of legendary genealogies in northern England and Iceland c. 1120-c. 1230, (dir. N. Berend, E. van Houts, University of Cambridge)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/context-and-purpose-legendary-genealogies-northern-england-and-iceland-c]