Archives de catégorie : institutions / Institutions

Anderson Katherine, The influence of Scots and Norse law on law and governance in Orkney and Shetland 1450-1650

Anderson Katherine, The influence of Scots and Norse law on law and governance in Orkney and Shetland 1450-1650, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015 (University of Aberdeen)

Continuer la lecture de Anderson Katherine, The influence of Scots and Norse law on law and governance in Orkney and Shetland 1450-1650

Julia Becker, Documenti latini e greci del conte Ruggero I di Calabria e Sicilia

Julia Becker, Documenti latini e greci del conte Ruggero I di Calabria e Sicilia. Edizione critica, Ricerche dell’Istituto Storico Germanico di Roma 9, Roma 2013.

 

Résumé/abstract :

Dopo la conquista della Calabria meridionale e della Sicilia (fine dell’ XI secolo), il conte Ruggero I si concentrò sul consolidamento del potere all’interno dei propri domini. Attraverso la riorganizzazione dell’amministrazione e delle strutture ecclesiastiche Ruggero pose le basi per lo sviluppo della monarchia normanna nel Mezzogiorno.

 

Nonostante la sua importanza storica mancavano finora una raccolta e un’edizione critica dei documenti da lui prodotti: l’ultimo tentativo di pubblicare gran parte dei diplomi risale ai secoli XVIII-XIX. Tale situazione documentaria ha contribuito a far sí che la figura del primo conte di Sicilia sia stata oggetto di scarso interesse storiogra- fico. Il libro raccoglie per la prima volta tutti i documenti greci e latini di Ruggero, alcuni dei quali inediti. Attraverso un apparato critico e un dettagliato commento diplomatico e contenutistico di ogni documento il libro apre la strada a possibili nuovi studi sulla storia siculo-normanna.

 

Lien/Link http://www.viella.it/libro/9788883347474

 

Svensson Ola, Nämnda ting men glömda. Ortnamn, landskap och rättsutövning

Svensson Ola, Nämnda ting men glömda. Ortnamn, landskap och rättsutövning  [Named but forgotten things: Place-names, landscape and justice], Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2015, (dir. G. Byrman, S. Nyström, Linnéuniversitetet)

Résumé/abstract :

The dissertation describes the names related to justice and places in the landscape where justice was administered, applying an interdisciplinary perspective with place names as the chief source material. One aim is to collect and describe place names in Skåne designating or indirectly associated with meeting places and districts of the court, and to study the named places. The study covers many different periods, but especially the Middle Ages and the transition from the Late Iron Age to the Middle Ages. The analysis raises questions such as: Was there continuity in judicial sites between prehistoric and historic times? How old are the hundreds (härader)? Is there a spatial link between judicial sites and other central functions such as cult, markets, or rulers’ estates? The work is permeated by material-based onomastic research in combination with current perspectives in text research, historical geography, and archaeology. Nine case studies are conducted to describe the interaction between place, linguistic expression, and meaning. The study demonstrates the existence of a large corpus of names reflecting the early administration of justice. Most of the many field names which contain ting ‘court’ and galge ‘gallows’ can be related to the actual administration of justice. The medieval sites where courts assembled and people were executed stand out in particular, but in many cases these have prehistoric roots. Both unbroken continuity and the reuse of earlier places of assembly may be assumed. Close to sites with names indicating the administration of justice there are also landscape features with names that grant epic and mythical status to the locale. The special quality of these places was handed down, incorporated in larger narratives, based on changing ideas and circumstances in different periods. The landscape of the hundred courts (häradsting) is archaic, magnificent and mythical, and shared, qualities that contributed to the maintenance and legitimation of judicial practice. A division into a general, public judicial sphere and a more limited and exclusive sphere can be seen. In the medieval exercise of justice this division is manifested in two different judicial districts – härad and birk – but the phenomenon can be traced back to the Late Iron Age. The study also problematizes a traditional image of the names of the hundreds.

[Source : http://lnu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A858241&dswid=-3585]

Stevenson John, The Plantagenet administration of Normandy, 1144-1204

Stevenson John, The Plantagenet administration of Normandy, 1144-1204, (dir. D. Power, Swansea University)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/plantagenet-administration-normandy-1144-1204]

Stevenson Abigail, From Domesday Book to the hundred rolls

Stevenson Abigail, From Domesday Book to the hundred rolls: lordship, government and society in England, 1066-1279, (dir. D. Carpenter, King’s College London)

En cours depuis 2012/In preparation since 2012

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/domesday-book-hundred-rolls-lordship-government-and-society-england-1066]

Majoros Christie, The function of hospitaller houses in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales

Majoros Christie, The function of hospitaller houses in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, (dir. H. Nicholson, P. Edbury, University of Cardiff)

En cours depuis 2013/In preparation since 2013

Résumé/abstract :

The specific goal of this project is to determine what kind of function the houses of the Hospitallers in the British Isles performed, or were intended to perform. Since it is clear that not all Hospitaller houses were built or acquiredfor a hospitable or charitable purpose, they must have been maintained by the Order for other reasons. I plan to investigate individual houses in an effort to determine what these other reasons were. Specifically, I will be looking for evidence of usefulness in one of four ways: martial, charitable, religious, or economic. The degree to which these houses were actually successful in fulfilling the function expected of them would be of secondary importance, entering into the discussion only where relevant to the determination of function. The project’s purpose is instead to create a comprehensive study that can be used as a tool for further research, allowing larger arguments to be made regarding both the activities and administrative practices of the Hospitaller Order in the British Isles, and how these practices figured into regional and international needs both within and outside of the Order.

[Source : http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/share/contactsandpeople/postgraduatestudents/christiemajoros-overview_new.html]

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales

Connors Owain, The landscapes of Anglo-Norman lordship in Wales, (dir. O. Creighton, S. Rippon, University of Exeter)

En cours depuis 2010/In preparation since 2010

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://eprofile.exeter.ac.uk/owainconnors/]

Cohen Robert, A history of taxation in England, c. 991-1232

Cohen Robert, A history of taxation in England, c. 991-1232, (dir. S. Baxter, D. Carpenter, King’s College London)

En cours depuis 2014/In preparation since 2014

Aucun résumé retrouvé/No abstract available

[Source : http://www.history.ac.uk/history-online/theses/thesis/in-progress/history-taxation-england-c991-1250]

Acta of the Plantagenets

Acta of the Plantagenets

Responsable du projet/Project leader :

Nicholas Vincent (n.vincent@uea.ac.uk)

Établissement principal/Main institution :

University of Cambridge

Projet en cours/Project in progress

Description :

The texts of original charters, writs, letters, and other documents, as well as copies and transcripts of them made between the twelfth century and the present, are being prepared for editions intended for publication, beginning with the acts of Henry II. In addition to those of Henry, the project has also collected the acts of Eleanor of Aquitaine, of Richard I, of John as Lord of Ireland and Count of Mortain, and of other members of the Plantagenet family.

[Lien/Link : http://www.britac.ac.uk/arp/acta.cfm]

Kaye Henrietta, Serving the man that ruled: aspects of the domestic arrangements of the household of King John, 1199-1216

Kaye Henrietta, Serving the man that ruled: aspects of the domestic arrangements of the household of King John, 1199-1216, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. S. Church, University of East Anglia)

King John played a direct role in the domestic arrangements of his household. He shifted the function of officials, moulded the structure of household offices and took personal control over the purveyance of food, wine and luxuries. During his reign, John adapted his household to suit his circumstances and personal method of ruling. These findings reveal that a medieval king could be directly involved in the minutiae of his domestic establishment; this is an aspect of kingship not previously noticed by historians. It is upon these findings that this thesis makes its greatest original contribution to our understanding of the period. To reach these conclusions, this thesis examines the officials at court and in the localities who enabled the domestic side of the household to function effectively. Hitherto, the medieval royal household of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries has been studied as part of the wider system of Angevin government. The political, administrative and financial elements of court are, however, entirely outside my remit. This thesis interrogates the evidence of the household ordinances from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries, by using a corpus of record sources extant from 1199 onwards, which break through the façade of departmentalism to reveal the complexity of the royal household. The king’s chamber and his stewards are the focus of the first two chapters. These chapters show the changing nature of the household; they reveal the expansion of the chamber’s sphere of function and the decline of the stewards’ domestic role. The purveyance of household victuals is the focus of the final three chapters. These chapters demonstrate how the peripatetic nature of John’s household was enabled through a network of local and court officials. By serving King John in his domestic needs, these officials were a vital tool in the facilitation of his rule.

[Source : https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/48684/]

Cartwright Charlotte, Matilda of Flanders in Normandy: a study of eleventh century female power

Cartwright Charlotte, Matilda of Flanders in Normandy: a study of eleventh century female power, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2012, (dir. P. Stafford, University of Liverpool)

Résumé/abstract :

Matilda of Flanders was the wife of William II, count/duke of Normandy and, from 1066, king of the English. This thesis is a study of her, and specifically of her power and authority, with a focus on her activity in Normandy rather than in England. This work builds on the existing historiography to examine Matilda in Normandy as a countess, and in comparison as a queen after 1066. The focus throughout is on contemporary sources, especially the writings of Dudo of Saint Quentin, William of Jumièges, William of Poitiers, and the more than five hundred surviving Norman and Anglo-Norman charters from the period 996-1086. The issue of legitimate marriage, which made a woman a wife and gave her access to power and authority through her family role, was critical, and Matilda’s marriage can be established as legitimate and secure. The bulk of this thesis considers the activity of the comital/ducal women recorded within the Norman charters, focusing on the actions which reveal power, and the descriptions which suggest the way in which they, and their authority, were perceived. Throughout, Matilda is compared with her predecessors, but also with contemporary men, especially the male members of the family. Close study of the source material reveals a Norman court in the tenth and eleventh century where family women, especially the legitimate wives of the count/dukes, were important actors. Matilda, however, was distinct from her predecessors: her power and authority greater than theirs. During her lifetime, there are hints at the development of an office of countess, and she appears to have acted as both a regent and a deputy in Normandy after the Conquest of England. Her activity as a queen, and the comparison with her as a countess, sheds light on both roles, suggesting that countesses could exercise a quasi queenly power, but also that coronation and inauguration set queens apart. However, even after Matilda’s coronation, the role of ‘wife’ was still important, as was family power.

[Source : http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.569147]

Sigríður Beck, I kungens frånvaro

Sigríður Beck, I kungens frånvaro. Formeringen av en isländsk aristokrati 1271–1387, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2011, (dir. T. Lindkvist, Auður G. Magnúsdóttir, Jón Viðar Sigurðsson, Université d’Islande)

Résumé/abstract :

Icelandic society was transformed during the 13th century. There was no kingdom in Iceland until 1262/1264, when the Norwegian kingship annexed the country. Along with the kingship a new political system, with new rules and ways to acquire power, emerged. The purpose of this dissertation is to study how an Icelandic aristocracy developed in 1271–1387. This process is examined through four empirically generated themes: the new administration; the social structure of the aristocracy; the political culture; and the economic base. Mainly, the source material consists of Icelandic annals, diplomas and the Sagas of bishops: Árna saga Þorlákssonar and Lárentíus saga.
The Icelandic elite achieved a new power structure that derived from the kingship. The forming and consolidation of an aristocracy took place during the 14th century. Three phases have been identified. The first was a contingency phase, when the old elite adapted to the new system while new men were starting to enter. The second phase was a forming phase. This lasted the entire century. The closure of the Icelandic aristocracy became more evident during the last decades of the 14th century. This closure was similar to what happened in the rest of Europe, where the aristocracy also was a mixture of an old elite and newcomers. Thus, the third phase was a stabilizing phase.
With a new way of legitimizing power society became more differentiated and hierarchical.
With staðamál the aristocracy’s traditional incomes ended since control over the local church institutions was partially lost to the diocese. Acquiring wealth through property and/or fishing replaced earlier systems. During the 13th century the tenant system (leiglendingssystem) developed and fish became increasingly important as a product for export. Even though the sources are scarce, it is obvious that the aristocracy acquired more properties. The consequence was a larger differentiation in society, where wealth accumulated in the hands of a few.

Rivchak Kirill, The Anglo-Danish elite in the power structure of early medieval England (1016-1066)

Rivchak Kirill, Англо-датская правящая элита в структуре власти раннесредневековой Англии (1016–1066 гг.) [The Anglo-Danish elite in the power structure of early medieval England (1016-1066)], Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2013, (dir. N. I. Basovskaya, Université d’État des sciences humaines de Russie)