Archaeologies of the Norman Conquest

Archaeologies of the Norman Conquest is a new research network examining the cultural, social, and political implications of the Norman Conquest through an explicit focus on archaeology and material culture. Its chief aims are to highlight the new insights and nuanced interpretations that archaeology can bring to this fundamental turning point in British history, and to articulate an inclusive research framework for the 11th and 12th centuries that brings together the scientific, humanistic, academic, professional, and public engagement arms of archaeology. It seeks to raise both academic and public awareness of the important role archaeology has to play in understanding this cultural touchstone.

This network is based around a series of three workshops, focusing on the themes of interpretative agendas, methodologies, and heritage and public impacts. Current research is beginning demonstrate that not only is the Norman Conquest visible in the archaeological record at a wide range of social levels and in many aspects of life, but also that if the right questions are asked of the data, the conclusions we can draw from the archaeology often contradict or add considerable nuance to the story of the Conquest told in the documentary record. By providing a forum for the presentation of innovative scholarship and the discussion of new questions, agendas, and research directions, the network will contribute to re-evaluating the long-standing narratives of the Conquest, its process, and its aftermath.

This project is funded by an AHRC Research Networking grant, led by the universities of York and Nottingham, with partnership from Norwich Castle Museum.

https://www.normanarchaeology.org/

Mobility during the Viking Age: Scandinavians and Others

Organized by Dr. Anna Kouremenos (Tübingen) and Dr. Fraser McNair (Leeds)

University of Tübingen, 27-28 September 2018

Voyages to and settlement in new lands have always held the greatest interest for those looking to understand the Vikings in academia and pop culture, from studies of the English Danelaw to Led Zeppelin. In recent years, though, scholars have focussed more than ever on concepts of migration, mobility, and diaspora when looking at the Norsemen. The time is ripe for a comparative perspective to be brought to bear on Viking activities from this point of view.

Viking activity, across the period between the late eighth and mid-eleventh centuries, has several well-known aspects. Vikings attacked and burned settlements; they were found as traders everywhere between Limerick and Samarkand; they settled and farmed the land; and individuals such as Rollo of Normandy and Roric of Dorestad took up service with non-Scandinavian rulers. But what made these aspects of Viking mobility distinctive? Magyars in Bavaria, Provençal noblemen in Burgundy, Catalans in the Spanish March, and defectors on the Arab-Byzantine border all share some of these characteristics. By putting Vikings in this wider frame of mobility and migration across earlier medieval Europe, we hope to contribute to debates about what was particularly Viking, and what was more universal. We will focus on four broad topics:

  • Raiding
  • Trading
  • Individual mobility
  • Group mobility

Continuer la lecture de Mobility during the Viking Age: Scandinavians and Others

17th International Saga Conference

17th International Saga Conference

Reykjavik and Reykholt, Iceland

12-17 August, 2018

The 17th International Saga Conference will take place in Reykjavík and Reykholt 12–17 August, 2018. The central theme is Íslendinga sǫgur and a subsidiary theme will be law and legal writing to mark the 900th anniversary of Iceland’s first written law code.

Plenary speakers will be:

  • Carol Clover, Professor Emeritus, University of California at Berkeley
  • Lena Rohrbach, Professor of Old Norse Studies at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
  • Andrew Wawn, Professor Emeritus, University of Leeds

Continuer la lecture de 17th International Saga Conference

Franck Lahbib, Edition et traduction du manuscrit F de Gui de Warewic : un roman anglo-normand de la fin du XIIe siècle

Franck Lahbib, Edition et traduction du manuscrit F de Gui de Warewic : un roman anglo-normand de la fin du XIIe siècle, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Montpellier 3)

Continuer la lecture de Franck Lahbib, Edition et traduction du manuscrit F de Gui de Warewic : un roman anglo-normand de la fin du XIIe siècle

Harriet Jean Evans, Animal-Human Relations on the Household-Farm in Viking Age and Medieval Iceland

Harriet Jean Evans, Animal-Human Relations on the Household-Farm in Viking Age and Medieval Iceland, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’York)

Continuer la lecture de Harriet Jean Evans, Animal-Human Relations on the Household-Farm in Viking Age and Medieval Iceland

Amélie Rigollet, La famille de Briouze, mi-XIᵉ siècle – 1326

Amélie Rigollet, La famille de Briouze, mi-XIᵉ siècle – 1326, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Poitiers)

Continuer la lecture de Amélie Rigollet, La famille de Briouze, mi-XIᵉ siècle – 1326

Bruno Nardeux, Une “forêt” royale au Moyen Âge : Le pays de Lyons, en Normandie (vers 1100 – vers 1450)

Bruno Nardeux, Une “forêt” royale au Moyen Âge : Le pays de Lyons, en Normandie (vers 1100 – vers 1450), Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Rouen Normandie)

Continuer la lecture de Bruno Nardeux, Une “forêt” royale au Moyen Âge : Le pays de Lyons, en Normandie (vers 1100 – vers 1450)

Matthew Mills, Behold your mother : the Virgin Mary in English monasticism, c. 1050-c. 1200

Matthew Mills, Behold your mother : the Virgin Mary in English monasticism, c. 1050-c. 1200, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2016 (Université d’Oxford)

Continuer la lecture de Matthew Mills, Behold your mother : the Virgin Mary in English monasticism, c. 1050-c. 1200

Megan Tiddeman, Money talks : Anglo-Norman, Italian and English language contact in medieval merchant documents, c1200-c1450

Megan Tiddeman, Money talks : Anglo-Norman, Italian and English language contact in medieval merchant documents, c1200-c1450, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’ Aberystwyth)

Continuer la lecture de Megan Tiddeman, Money talks : Anglo-Norman, Italian and English language contact in medieval merchant documents, c1200-c1450

William Hereward Norman, The classical Barbarian in the Íslendingasögur

William Hereward Norman, The classical Barbarian in the Íslendingasögur, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2018 (Université de Cambridge)

Continuer la lecture de William Hereward Norman, The classical Barbarian in the Íslendingasögur

Thomas Harry Chadwick, ‘Normanitas’ revisited : reconsidering Norman ethnicity, 996-1159

Thomas Harry Chadwick, ‘Normanitas’ revisited : reconsidering Norman ethnicity, 996-1159, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’Exeter)

Continuer la lecture de Thomas Harry Chadwick, ‘Normanitas’ revisited : reconsidering Norman ethnicity, 996-1159

Hazel Anne Freestone, The priest’s wife in the Anglo-Norman realm, 1050-1150

Hazel Anne Freestone, The priest’s wife in the Anglo-Norman realm, 1050-1150, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2018 (Université de Cambridge)

Continuer la lecture de Hazel Anne Freestone, The priest’s wife in the Anglo-Norman realm, 1050-1150

Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk

Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université de Stockholm)

Continuer la lecture de Linn Eikje Ramberg, Mynt er hva mynt gjør : En analyse av norske mynter fra 1100-tallet: produksjon, sirkulasjon og bruk

Nikolas Gunn, Contact and Christianisation: Reassessing Purported English Loanwords in Old Norse

Nikolas Gunn, Contact and Christianisation: Reassessing Purported English Loanwords in Old Norse, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’York)

Continuer la lecture de Nikolas Gunn, Contact and Christianisation: Reassessing Purported English Loanwords in Old Norse

Timothy Carlisle, The walrus in the walls and other strange tales : a comparative study of house-rites in the Viking-age North Atlantic Region

Timothy Carlisle, The walrus in the walls and other strange tales : a comparative study of house-rites in the Viking-age North Atlantic Region, Thèse de doctorat soutenue en 2017 (Université d’ Aberdeen)

Continuer la lecture de Timothy Carlisle, The walrus in the walls and other strange tales : a comparative study of house-rites in the Viking-age North Atlantic Region